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Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

, Volume 26, Issue 2, pp 515–521 | Cite as

Color-relation-based capture occurs globally

  • Huimin Hua
  • Jie Zhang
  • Yanju Li
  • Feng DuEmail author
Article
  • 73 Downloads

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that a distractor matching the target–nontarget color relation did not capture attention when it appeared outside of the attentional window, indicating that color-relation-based attention is lack of global selection. The present study examined whether a distractor best matching the target–nontarget color relation instead of the target color captured attention outside of the attentional window. The results consistently showed that peripheral distractors best matching the target–nontarget color relation instead of the target color captured attention outside of the attentional window. Additionally, color-relation-matched distractors outweighed target-color-matched distractors in capturing attention under this circumstance. This suggests that the color-relation-based attention shares the hallmark of global selection with the color-based attention. Combined with the previous finding of double dissociation of color-relation-based attention and color-based attention (Du & Jiao, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 42(4), 480–493, 2016; Du, Yin, Qi, & Zhang, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21(4), 1011–1018, 2014), preference for color-relation within the attentional window and priority for target color outside of the attentional window might be a strategic choice of visual attention.

Keywords

Attentional capture Relation-based attention Attentional window 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31470982) and the scientific foundation of the Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Y4CX033008).

Author contributions

The study was conceived by F. Du. H. Hua, J. Zhang, and Y. Li collected and analyzed data under F. Du’s supervision. F. Du, and H. Hua, and J. Zhang wrote the manuscript. H. Hua and J. Zhang contributed equally to this study.

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Copyright information

© The Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of PsychologyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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