Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 815–823

Distal prosody affects learning of novel words in an artificial language

  • Tuuli H. Morrill
  • J. Devin McAuley
  • Laura C. Dilley
  • Patrycja A. Zdziarska
  • Katherine B. Jones
  • Lisa D. Sanders
Brief Report

DOI: 10.3758/s13423-014-0733-z

Cite this article as:
Morrill, T.H., McAuley, J.D., Dilley, L.C. et al. Psychon Bull Rev (2015) 22: 815. doi:10.3758/s13423-014-0733-z

Abstract

The distal prosodic patterning established at the beginning of an utterance has been shown to influence downstream word segmentation and lexical access. In this study, we investigated whether distal prosody also affects word learning in a novel (artificial) language. Listeners were exposed to syllable sequences in which the embedded words were either congruent or incongruent with the distal prosody of a carrier phrase. Local segmentation cues, including the transitional probabilities between syllables, were held constant. During a test phase, listeners rated the items as either words or nonwords. Consistent with the perceptual grouping of syllables being predicted by distal prosody, congruent items were more likely to be judged as words than were incongruent items. The results provide the first evidence that perceptual grouping affects word learning in an unknown language, demonstrating that distal prosodic effects may be independent of lexical or other language-specific knowledge.

Keywords

Speech perception Language acquisition Word segmentation Distal prosody 

Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tuuli H. Morrill
    • 1
  • J. Devin McAuley
    • 2
  • Laura C. Dilley
    • 3
  • Patrycja A. Zdziarska
    • 2
  • Katherine B. Jones
    • 2
  • Lisa D. Sanders
    • 4
  1. 1.Program in Linguistics, Department of EnglishGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  3. 3.Department of Communicative Sciences and DisordersMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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