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Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics

, Volume 81, Issue 2, pp 590–597 | Cite as

Test-retest reliability of and age-related changes in the subjective postural vertical on the diagonal plane in healthy subjects

  • Kazuhiro FukataEmail author
  • Kazu Amimoto
  • Daisuke Sekine
  • Yuka Ikarashi
  • Yuji Fujino
  • Masahide Inoue
  • Mamiko Inoue
  • Shunichi Ishihara
  • Hidetoshi Takahashi
  • Shigeru Makita
Article
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Abstract

The subjective postural vertical (SPV) reflects gravity perception when the eyes are closed. Changes in the SPV on both the frontal and sagittal planes occur in response to neurological disorders and aging; however, these changes on the diagonal plane are unclear. Here we examined test–retest reliability (n=16) of and age-related changes (n=38) in the SPV on the diagonal plane. Subjects sat on an electrical vertical board (EVB), which was used to measure the SPV on the diagonal plane. An experimenter controlled and moved the EVB seat at a constant speed on the diagonal plane and measured the seat’s tilt using a digital inclinometer when subjects verbally reported that they had reached a true vertical position. Measurement was performed for eight trials, and the mean (tilt direction) and standard deviation (variability) were calculated. To determine test–retest reliability, the same experimenter repeatedly measured the SPV 1 week later. To assess age-related changes, tilt direction and variability were compared between the young (n=20) and elderly (n=18) groups. Test–retest reliability on the right and left diagonal planes was 0.61 or more. Moreover, tilt direction on the right diagonal plane – but not on the left diagonal plane – indicated a significant diagonally backward deviation in the elderly group compared with that in the young group. Variability was significantly higher in the elderly group on both planes. SPV measurement on the diagonal plane was indicated, and age-related changes were identified. Thus, future studies should assess the potential clinical applications of SPV in neurological disorders.

Keywords

Perception and action Neuropsychology Cognitive neuroscience 

Notes

Funding

This research was supported by funding from the Hidaka Project (28-D-1-09) at Saitama Medical University International Medical Center.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuhiro Fukata
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Kazu Amimoto
    • 2
  • Daisuke Sekine
    • 1
  • Yuka Ikarashi
    • 1
  • Yuji Fujino
    • 1
  • Masahide Inoue
    • 1
  • Mamiko Inoue
    • 1
  • Shunichi Ishihara
    • 3
  • Hidetoshi Takahashi
    • 4
  • Shigeru Makita
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation CenterSaitama Medical University International Medical CenterSaitamaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Physical TherapyTokyo Metropolitan UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Human Sciences, Faculty of Human SciencesBunkyo UniversitySaitamaJapan
  4. 4.Department of RehabilitationSaitama Medical University International Medical CenterSaitamaJapan

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