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Memory & Cognition

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 367–374 | Cite as

A mere exposure effect for transformed three-dimensional objects: Effects of reflection, size, or color changes on affect and recognition

  • John G. Seamon
  • Donna Ganor-Stern
  • Michael J. Crowley
  • Sarah M. Wilson
  • Wendy J. Weber
  • Corinne M. O’Rourke
  • Joseph K. Mahoney
Article

Abstract

If the mere exposure effect is based on implicit memory, recognition and affect judgments should be dissociated by experimental variables in the same manner as other explicit and implicit measures. Consistent with results from recognition and picture naming or object decision priming tasks (e.g., Biederman & E. E. Cooper, 1991, 1992; L. A. Cooper, Schacter, Ballesteros, & Moore, 1992), the present research showed that recognition memory but not affective preference was impaired by reflection or size transformations of three-dimensional objects between study and test. Stimulus color transformations had no effect on either measure. These results indicate that representations that support recognition memory code spatial information about an object’s left-right orientation and size, whereas representations that underlie affective preference do not. Insensitivity to surface feature changes that do not alter object form appears to be a general characteristic of implicit memory measures, including the affective preference task.

Keywords

Journal ofExperimental Psychology Implicit Memory Picture Naming Implicit Measure Mere Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Seamon
    • 1
  • Donna Ganor-Stern
    • 1
  • Michael J. Crowley
    • 1
  • Sarah M. Wilson
    • 1
  • Wendy J. Weber
    • 1
  • Corinne M. O’Rourke
    • 1
  • Joseph K. Mahoney
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWesleyan UniversityMiddletown

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