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Memory & Cognition

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 261–269 | Cite as

Inhibiting effects of recall

  • Henry L. Roediger
Article

Abstract

Evidence is reviewed indicating that output interference—the deleterious effects of recall of some information on information recalled later—occurs both in primary and secondary memory. It appears that output interference provides at least a partial account for the disparity between information available in memory and its accessibility at recall. It is argued that consideration of output interference may provide a helpful perspective in resolving problems in the study of episodic and semantic memory, including the negative effects of part-list cueing and the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon.

Keywords

Free Recall Serial Position Semantic Memory Primary Memory Secondary Memory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry L. Roediger
    • 1
  1. 1.Yale UniversityNew Haven

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