Perception of biological motion: A stimulus set of human point-light actions

Article

Abstract

We present a set of stimuli representing human actions under point-light conditions, as seen from different viewpoints. The set contains 22 fairly short, well-delineated, and visually “loopable” actions. For each action, we provide movie files from five different viewpoints as well as a text file with the three spatial coordinates of the point lights, allowing researchers to construct customized versions. The full set of stimuli may be downloaded fromwww.psychonomic.org/archive/.

Supplementary material

Vanrie-BRM-2004.zip (2.5 mb)
Supplementary material, approximately 340 KB.

References

  1. Ahlström, V., Blake, R., &Ahlström, U. (1997). Perception of biological motion.Perception,26, 1539–1548.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Autodesk, Inc. (1997).Autodesk 3D studio max (Release 2). Sausalito, CA: Author.Google Scholar
  3. Autodesk, Inc. (1998).Character studio max (Release 2). Sausalito, CA: Author.Google Scholar
  4. Cutting, J. E. (1978). A program to generate synthetic walkers as dynamic point-light displays.Behavior Research Methods & Instrumentation,10, 91–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cutting, J. E., &Kozlowski, L. T. (1977). Recognizing friends by their walk: Gait perception without familiarity cues.Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society,9, 353–356.Google Scholar
  6. Daems, A., &Verfaillie, K. (1999). Viewpoint-dependent priming effects in the perception of human actions and body postures.Visual Cognition,6,665–693.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dekeyser, M., Verfaillie, K., &Vanrie, J. (2002). Creating stimuli for the study of biological-motion perception.Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers,34,375–382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Dittrich, W. H. (1993). Action categories and the perception of biological motion.Perception,22,15–22.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Dittrich, W. H., Troscianko, T., Lea, S., &Morgan, D. (1996). Perception of emotion from dynamic point-light displays represented in dance.Per ception,25, 727–738.Google Scholar
  10. Druks, J., &Masterson, J. (2000).An object and action naming battery. London: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
  11. Fiez, J. A., &Tranel, D. (1997). Standardized stimuli and procedures for investigating the retrieval of lexical and conceptual knowledge for actions.Memory & Cognition,25, 543–569.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Johansson, G. (1973). Visual perception of biological motion and a model for its analysis.Perception & Psychophysics,14, 201–211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Olofsson, U., Nyberg, L., &Nilsson, L.-G. (1997). Priming and recognition of human motion patterns.Visual Cognition,4, 373–382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Oxford Metrics, Ltd. (1997).Body builder version 3.5. Oxford, U.K.: Author.Google Scholar
  15. Peuskens, H., Vanrie, J., Verfaillie, K., & Orban, G. (2004).Human superior temporal sulcus motion region processes actions portrayed in biological motion stimuli. Manuscript submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  16. Vanrie, J., Dekeyser, M., &Verfaillie, K. (2004). Bistability and biasing effects in the perception of an ambiguous point-light walker.Perception,33,547–560.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Verfaillie, K. (1993). Orientation-dependent priming effects in the perception of biological motion.Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance,19,992–1013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Verfaillie, K. (2000). Visual perception of human locomotion: Priming effects in direction discrimination.Brain & Cognition,44, 192–213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Verfaillie, K., De Troy, A., &,Van Rensbergen, J. (1994). Transsaccadic integration of biological motion.Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition,20, 649–670.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Experimental PsychologyKatholieke Universiteit LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

Personalised recommendations