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Memory & Cognition

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 196–200 | Cite as

Influence of marihuana on storage and retrieval processe in memory

  • C. F. Darley
  • J. R. Tinklenberg
  • W. T. Roth
  • L. E. Hollister
  • R. C. Atkinson
Article

Abstract

Following presentation and immediate free recall testing of 10 20-word lists, 48 Ss were divided into two groups, one of which received an oral dose of marihuana extract calibrated to 20 mg of Δ1-THC and one of which received placebo. One hour later, all Ss were administered delayed recall, recognition, and order tests on the first set of words. Presentation of another set of 10 lists followed, and there were immediate recall and delayed recall, recognition, and order tests on these words. Performance of drug and placebo Ss did not differ significantly for any of the first delayed tests. However, the performance of drug Ss was poorer than that of placebo Ss on immediate recall, delayed recall, and delayed recognition of the second set of lists. We concluded that retrieval of information relevant to the occurrence or nonocurrence of an event was not affected by marihuana intoxication. Storage difficulties probably account for memory deficits due to the drug, and these difficulties appear to occur in the process of transferring information from short-term to long-term memory.

Keywords

Free Recall Serial Position Recognition Test Recall Test Serial Position Curve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. F. Darley
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. R. Tinklenberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. T. Roth
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. E. Hollister
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. C. Atkinson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyStanford UniversityStanford
  2. 2.Palo Alto Veterans Administration HospitalPalo Alto

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