Memory & Cognition

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 226–230

Maintenance rehearsal and long-term recency

  • Dewey Rundus
Article
  • 927 Downloads

Abstract

Maintenance (Type 1) rehearsal has been assumed to produce no increase in item recalla-bility. Studies supporting this assumption have, however, tested limited ranges of the rehearsal time variable. The present study varied the time spent in Type 1 rehearsal over an extended range, and, with this added design sensitivity, recall was observed to be positively related to rehearsal duration. In addition, a pronounced long-term recency effect was observed. Both findings were interpreted as reflecting the role of contextual cues. An expanded description of the memorial product of Type 1 processing allows a preservation of the Type l/Type 2 processing distinction and a reconciliation of the present and previous maintenance rehearsal data.

References

  1. Atkinson, R. C., &Shiffrin, R. M. Human memory: A proposed system and its control processes. In K. W. Spence & J. T. Spence (Eds.),The psychology of learning and motivation: Advances in research and theory (Vol. 2). New York: Academic Press, 1968.Google Scholar
  2. Baddeley, A. D.The psychology of memory. New York: Basic Books, 1976.Google Scholar
  3. Bjork, R. A., &Whixten, W. B. Recency-sensitive retrieval processes in long-term free recall.Cognitive Psychology, 1974,6, 173–189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Craik, F. I. M., &Locruart, R. S. Levels of processing: A framework for memory research.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1972,11, 671–684.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Craik, F. I. M., &Watkins, M. J. The role of rehearsal in short-term memory.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1973,12, 599–607.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Glanzer, M., &Cunitz, A. R. Two storage mechanisms in free recall.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1966,5, 351–360.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Glenberg, A., &Adams, F. Type I: Rehearsal and recognition.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1978,17, 455–463.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Glenberg, A., Smith, S. M., &Green, C. Type I: Rehearsal, maintenance and more.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1977,16, 339–352.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. McFarland, C. E., Jr.,Rhodes, D. D., &Frey, T. J. Semantic-feature variability and the spacing effect.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1979,18, 163–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Marshall, P. H., &Werder, P. R. The effects of the elimination of rehearsal on primacy and recency.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1972,11, 649–653.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Nelson, T. O. Repetition and depth of processing.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1977,16, 151–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Poltrocr, S. E., &MacLeod, C. M. Primacy and recency in the continuous distractor paradigm.Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory, 1977,3, 560–571.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Postman, L., &Phillips, L. W. Studies in incidental learning: The effects of crowding and isolation.Journal of Experimental Psychology, 1954,48, 48–56.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Rundus, D. Maintenance rehearsal and single-level processing.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1977,16, 665–681.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Rundus, D., &Atkinson, R. C. Rehearsal processes in free recall: A procedure for direct observation.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1970,9, 99–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Tzeng, O. J. L. Positive recency effect in a delayed free recall.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1973,12, 436–439.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Waugh, S. C., &Norman, D. A. Primary memory.Psychological Review, 1965,72, 89–104.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Woodward, A. E., Jr.,Bjork, R. A., &Jongeward, R. H., Jr. Recall and recognition as a function of primary rehearsal.Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 1973,12, 608–617.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dewey Rundus
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentUniversity of South FloridaTampa

Personalised recommendations