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Cross sections of 43Sc, 44Sc, 46Sc isotopes formed in the 45Sc + 3He reaction

  • N. K. SkobelevEmail author
  • A. A. Kulko
  • Yu. E. Penionzhkevich
  • E. I. Voskoboynik
  • V. Kroha
  • V. Burjan
  • Z. Hons
  • J. Mrázek
  • Š. Piskoř
  • E. Šimečkova
Proceedings of the International Conference “Nucleus-2012”. “Fundamental Problems of Nuclear Physics, Atomic Power Engineering and Nuclear Technologies” (The 62nd International Conference on Nuclear Spectroscopy and the Structure of Atomic Nuclei)

Abstract

Reactions 45Sc(3He, αn)43Sc, 45Sc(3He, α)44Sc and 45Sc(3He, 2p)46Sc in the 3He energy range of 5 to 24 MeV are investigated in experiments performed with a 3He ion beam during the irradiation of U-120M cyclotron scandium targets. Activation is used to determine the yield of nascent Sc isotopes. The γ activity induced in targets is measured using a high-resolution HPGe detector. The character of the excitation function changes during the formation of these ions and differs from the excitation functions for deuterons, despite the low bond energy of 3He and the positive values of the Q reactions leading to the formation of 44Sc and 46Sc isotopes. The cross sections of 44Sc formation reach their maximum value at the Coulomb barrier of the reaction, due to the stable 4He nucleus that accompanies the formation of 44Sc. The contribution from different reaction mechanisms to the cross sections of 43Sc, 44Sc, and 46Sc isotope formation are considered.

Keywords

Excitation Function Coulomb Barrier Neutron Transfer Nucleon Transfer 44Sc Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Allerton Press, Inc. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. K. Skobelev
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. A. Kulko
    • 1
  • Yu. E. Penionzhkevich
    • 1
  • E. I. Voskoboynik
    • 1
  • V. Kroha
    • 2
  • V. Burjan
    • 2
  • Z. Hons
    • 2
  • J. Mrázek
    • 2
  • Š. Piskoř
    • 2
  • E. Šimečkova
    • 2
  1. 1.Joint Institute for Nuclear ResearchDubnaRussia
  2. 2.Nuclear Physics InstituteAcademy of Sciences of the Czech RepublicRežu PrahyCzech Republic

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