Advertisement

Steel in Translation

, Volume 47, Issue 8, pp 523–527 | Cite as

Application of the triad of blast furnace, oxygen converter, and electric arc furnace for reducing of carbon footprint

  • V. G. Lisienko
  • Yu. N. Chesnokov
  • A. V. Lapteva
Article
  • 17 Downloads

Abstract

Carbon footprint is the mass of carbon formed in the full cycle of manufacturing one kind or another product. This carbon is included in greenhouse gases. During production of iron and steel are generated carbon monoxide and greenhouse gases: methane, and carbon dioxide. Methane and carbon monoxide burn to carbon dioxide by secondary energy resources. By this means, the carbon footprint by the production of iron and steel has determined by the weight of carbon dioxide formed in this production. As results of analysis of the processes of manufacture of iron and steel, it has revealed that the tandem of blast furnace with electric arc furnace is characterized by a lower value of integrated emissions of CO2 than the tandem of blast furnace with an oxygen converter. It was proposed to process of the cast iron made by one blast furnace, then in the oxygen converter, and, at last, in one or more electric arc furnaces. Moreover, the electric arc furnace is loaded by 30% of iron produced in blast furnace, and the remaining 70% are complemented by metal scrap. In the oxygen converter is loaded, the part of cast iron (75–85%), that remained after processing in the arc furnace. The converter is applied the metal scrap for full loading. Calculations of total emission of carbon dioxide for different triads of these units are made. Simultaneous use of oxygen converter with electric arc furnaces for cast iron smelting (obtained from one blast furnace) helps to reduce reliably the emission of carbon dioxide to 20% as it is follows from these calculations. This suggests that such a triad of used units conforms to green technology. Example of the use of mentioned triad is for a full load of the converter applied to metal scrap. The calculations total emissions of carbon dioxide for different triads of these units were performed. From these calculations it follows that the simultaneous use of oxygen converters after electric arc furnaces for smelting iron (obtained from one blast furnace), it helps to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide to 20%. This suggests that this triad of used units conforms to green technology. An example of using this triad is in the Magnitogorsk Iron and Steel Works, where along with the oxygen converter, electric arc furnaces with the use of locally produced electricity at burning fuel of secondary energy resources from units, in which the fuel is burnt. This practice can be recommended for a number of other metallurgical enterprises.

Keywords

emission of carbon dioxide carbon footprint cast iron steel blast furnace oxygen converter electric arc furnace 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Kyoto Protocol, Novaya Gazeta, 2009, no. 72, July 8.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Vladimir Putin speech at the World Climate Change Conference 2015 (COP21) at Le Bourget, near Paris, France, November 30, 2015. http://www.vsesovetnik. ru/archives/8732.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    GOST (State Standard) R ISO 14064-1-2007: Greenhouse Gases. Part 1. Specification with Guidance at the Organizational Level for Quantification and Reporting of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Removals, Moscow: Standartinform, 2010.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Tyler Miller, G., Living in the Environment: Principles, Connections, and Solutions, Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1979, vol. 2.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Tyler Miller, G., Living in the Environment: Principles, Connections, and Solutions, Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1979, vol. 3.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Udal’tsov, A., Poezd nadezhdy: ekologicheskie meridiany i paralleli: uchebnoe posobie dlya vuzov (Train of Hope: Ecological Meridians and Parallels: Manual for Higher Education Institutions), Moscow: Politizdat, 1984.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    IPCC 2006, 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, Eggleston, H.S., Buendia, L., Miwa, K., Ngara, T., and Tanabe, K., Eds., Hayama: Inst. Global Environ. Strategies, 2007.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Potapochkin, A.N., Simonyan, L.M., Chernousov, P.I., and Kosyrev, K.L., Consumption of carbon and CO2 emissions, Stal’, 2004, no. 9, pp. 69–72.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Shevelev, L.N., Methodical bases of inventory of greenhouse gases in ferrous metallurgy of Russia, Stal’, 2007, no. 4, pp. 97–102.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Shevelev, L.N., Assessment of emissions of greenhouse gases in ferrous metallurgy of Russia, Chern. Metall., 2008, no. 8 (1304), pp. 3–8.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Kalenskii, I.V., Recommendations about the accounting of CO2 emissions at the enterprises of ferrous metallurgy, Stal’, 2007, no. 5, pp. 121–129.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Chesnokov, Yu.N., Lisienko, V.G., and Lapteva, A.V., Mathematical models of indirect estimates of CO2 emission in some metallurgical processes, Stal’, 2011, no. 8, pp. 74–77.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Chesnokov, Yu.N., Lisienko, V.G., and Lapteva, A.V., Evaluating the carbon footprint from the production of steel in an electric-arc furnace, Metallurgist, 2014, vol. 57, nos. 9–10, pp. 774–778.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Chesnokov, Yu.N., Lisienko, V.G., and Lapteva, A.V., Graph model for carbon dioxide emissions from metallurgical plants, Metallurgist, 2013, vol. 56, nos. 11–12, pp. 888–893.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Lisienko, V.G., Lapteva, A.V., Chesnokov, Yu.N., and Lugovkin, V.V., Greenhouse-gas (CO2) emissions in the steel industry, Steel Transl., 2015, vol. 45, no. 9, pp. 623–626.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Gileva, L.Yu. and Zagainov, S.A., Balansovye metody rascheta protsessov polucheniya chuguna: uchebnoe posobie dlya vuzov (Balance Methods of Calculation of Processes of Production of Cast Iron: Manual for Higher Education Institutions), Yekaterinburg: Ural. Fed. Univ., 2011.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Obukhov, V.M., Sharikov, V.M., Deryabin, Yu.A., Spirin, V.A., and Chernavin, S.B., Proektirovanie i oborudovanie staleplavil’nykh tsekhov: monografiya (Engineering and Equipment of Steel-Smelting Shops: Monograph), Yekaterinburg, 2010.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Svinolobov, N.P. and Brovkin, V.L., Pechi chernoi metallurgii: uchebnoe posobie dlya vuzov (Furnaces for Ferrous Metallurgy: Manual for Higher Education Institutions), Dnepropetrovsk: Porogi, 2004.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Yusfin, Yu.S. and Pashkov, N.F., Metallurgiya zheleza: uchebnik dlya vuzov (Metallurgy of Iron: Manual for Higher Education Institutions), Moscow: Akademkniga, 2007.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Protsess Romelt (Romelt Process), Roments, V.A., Ed., Moscow: Ruda i Metally, 2005.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Voskoboinikov, V.G., Kudrin, V.A., and Yakushev, A.M., Obshchaya metallurgiya: uchebnik dlya vuzov (General Metallurgy: Manual for Higher Education Institutions), Moscow: Akademkniga, 2005.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Zagainov, S.A., Coal-dust fuel can successfully be applied in domain melting of titanomagnetit, Chern. Metall., 2014, no. 3, pp. 42–46.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Allerton Press, Inc. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. G. Lisienko
    • 1
  • Yu. N. Chesnokov
    • 1
  • A. V. Lapteva
    • 1
  1. 1.Ural Federal UniversityYekaterinburgRussia

Personalised recommendations