Energy spectra of abundant nuclei of primary cosmic rays from the data of ATIC-2 experiment: Final results

  • A. D. Panov
  • J. H. AdamsJr.
  • H. S. Ahn
  • G. L. Bashinzhagyan
  • J. W. Watts
  • J. P. Wefel
  • J. Wu
  • O. Ganel
  • T. G. Guzik
  • V. I. Zatsepin
  • I. Isbert
  • K. C. Kim
  • M. Christl
  • E. N. Kouznetsov
  • M. I. Panasyuk
  • E. S. Seo
  • N. V. Sokolskaya
  • J. Chang
  • W. K. H. Schmidt
  • A. R. Fazely
Open Access
Article

DOI: 10.3103/S1062873809050098

Cite this article as:
Panov, A.D., Adams, J.H., Ahn, H.S. et al. Bull. Russ. Acad. Sci. Phys. (2009) 73: 564. doi:10.3103/S1062873809050098

Abstract

The final results of processing the data from the balloon-born experiment ATIC-2 (Antarctica, 2002–2003) for the energy spectra of protons and He, C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe nuclei, the spectrum of all particles, and the mean logarithm of atomic weight of primary cosmic rays as a function of energy are presented. The final results are based on improvement of the methods used earlier, in particular, considerably increased resolution of the charge spectrum. The preliminary conclusions on the significant difference in the spectra of protons and helium nuclei (the proton spectrum is steeper) and the non-power character of the spectra of protons and heavier nuclei (flattening of carbon spectrum at energies above 10 TeV) are confirmed. A complex structure of the energy dependence of the mean logarithm of atomic weight is found.

Copyright information

© Allerton Press, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Panov
    • 1
  • J. H. AdamsJr.
    • 2
  • H. S. Ahn
    • 3
  • G. L. Bashinzhagyan
    • 1
  • J. W. Watts
    • 2
  • J. P. Wefel
    • 4
  • J. Wu
    • 3
  • O. Ganel
    • 3
  • T. G. Guzik
    • 4
  • V. I. Zatsepin
    • 1
  • I. Isbert
    • 4
  • K. C. Kim
    • 3
  • M. Christl
    • 2
  • E. N. Kouznetsov
    • 4
  • M. I. Panasyuk
    • 1
  • E. S. Seo
    • 3
  • N. V. Sokolskaya
    • 1
  • J. Chang
    • 6
    • 7
  • W. K. H. Schmidt
    • 7
  • A. R. Fazely
    • 5
  1. 1.Skobel’tsyn Institute of Nuclear PhysicsMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Marshall Space Flight CenterHuntsvilleUSA
  3. 3.University of MarylandBaltimoreUSA
  4. 4.Southeastern Louisiana UniversityHammondUSA
  5. 5.Southern UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  6. 6.Purple Mountain ObservatoryNanjinChina
  7. 7.Max Planck InstituteLeipzigGermany

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