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Geochronometria

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 116–127 | Cite as

The North Dvina river delta development over the Holocene: Geochronology and palaeoenvironment

  • Nataliya E. ZaretskayaEmail author
  • Nataliya V. Shevchenko
  • Alexandra N. Simakova
  • Leopold D. Sulerzhitsky
Article

Abstract

In this paper, a detailed overview of the Holocene evolution of the North Dvina river (ND) delta (southern White Sea) is presented; it is based on radiocarbon dating, geomorphological and other field surveys, and plant macrofossil and palynological data. We have identified three main stages of the delta evolution: estuary erosional (Allerød — 5700 cal BC), lagoon or tidal-marsh (5700 cal BC — 3700 cal BC) and fan-delta accumulative (3700 cal BC — present). These stages are correlated with local climatic curves, sea level changes, glacioisostatic raise curve and Baltic Sea stages. A variety of landforms has been identified and dated within the delta. These results help to explain the spatial and temporal patterns in the prehistoric human occupation of this area.

Keywords

North Dvina River delta White Sea Holocene geochronology radiocarbon dating landforms palaeoenvironmental reconstructions land evolution 

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Copyright information

© © Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nataliya E. Zaretskaya
    • 1
    Email author
  • Nataliya V. Shevchenko
    • 2
  • Alexandra N. Simakova
    • 1
  • Leopold D. Sulerzhitsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Geological Institute of Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Geography FacultyMoscow State University n.a. M.V. LomonosovVorobiovy Gory, MoscowRussia

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