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Acta Parasitologica

, Volume 64, Issue 3, pp 638–644 | Cite as

Seasonal Dynamics of Gastrointestinal Nematode Infections of Goats and Emergence of Ivermectin Resistance in Haemonchus contortus in Hubei Province, China

  • Wei Yuan
  • Ke Lu
  • Hao Li
  • Jinming LiuEmail author
  • Chuanchuan He
  • Jintao Feng
  • Xin Zhang
  • Yudan Mao
  • Yang Hong
  • Yu Zhou
  • Jun Lu
  • Yamei Jin
  • Jiaojiao Lin
Original Paper
  • 27 Downloads

Abstract

Introduction

Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) are a major constraint to the survival and productivity of animals. In southern China, goats are the most important small domestic ruminants.

Methods

From May 2013 to May 2017, we conducted a longitudinal study of hircine GIN infections in Huangshantou Town, Gongan County, Hubei Province, China, using fecal egg counts.

Results

Our investigation revealed that the GINs of goats in Hubei Province have changed significantly. Over 90% of eggs detected in the first month of investigation, May 2013, belonged to the species Haemonchus contortus and Chabertia sp. There was no seasonal variation in positive rates (PRs) of GINs, but the mean eggs per gram (EPG) of GINs were higher between April and July than between September and November (P < 0.05). The gradual increase in the percentage of H. contortus eggs among all detected eggs during our research and the low cure rate of IVM mass treatment revealed the emergence of IVM resistance in H. contortus. After the implementation of an integrated GIN control strategy, which included two mass treatments (one in April/May with ABZ and another in September/October with IVM + ABZ), in 2016 and 2017, both the PRs and EPG of GINs were significantly reduced.

Conclusion

The results presented here reveal that controlling GINs of small ruminants in small farms in southern China requires an integrated control strategy that should include monitoring of infection and anthelmintic resistance, and increased farmer education on the importance of using the appropriate drugs at the correct dose.

Keywords

Gastrointestinal nematode Goat Ivermectin resistance Southern China 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Special Fund for Agro-Scientific Research in the Public Interest (Grant Number 201303037), the Science and Technology Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31572218). We thank the veterinary professionals and agricultural workers of Gongan County for their assistance in collecting fecal samples. We thank International Science Editing (http://www.internationalscienceediting.com) for editing this manuscript.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Witold Stefański Institute of Parasitology, Polish Academy of Sciences 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Yuan
    • 1
  • Ke Lu
    • 1
  • Hao Li
    • 1
  • Jinming Liu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Chuanchuan He
    • 1
  • Jintao Feng
    • 1
  • Xin Zhang
    • 1
  • Yudan Mao
    • 1
  • Yang Hong
    • 1
  • Yu Zhou
    • 2
  • Jun Lu
    • 3
  • Yamei Jin
    • 1
  • Jiaojiao Lin
    • 1
  1. 1.National Laboratory of Animal Schistosomiasis Control/Key Laboratory of Animal Parasitology, Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai Veterinary Research InstituteChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Hubei Center for Animal Disease Control and PreventionWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Gongan County Center for Animal Disease Control and PreventionJingzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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