Acta Parasitologica

, Volume 58, Issue 3, pp 297–303 | Cite as

Urinary creatinine to serum creatinine ratio and renal failure index in dogs infected with Babesia canis

  • Wojciech Zygner
  • Olga Gójska-Zygner
  • Agnieszka Wesołowska
  • Halina Wędrychowicz
Original Paper

Abstract

Urinary creatinine to serum creatinine (UCr/SCr) ratio and renal failure index (RFI) are useful indices of renal damage. Both UCr/SCr ratio and RFI are used in differentiation between prerenal azotaemia and acute tubular necrosis. In this work the authors calculated the UCr/SCr ratio and RFI in dogs infected with Babesia canis and the values of these indices in azotaemic dogs infected with the parasite. The results of this study showed significantly lower UCr/SCr ratio in dogs infected with B. canis than in healthy dogs. Moreover, in azotaemic dogs infected with B. canis the UCr/SCr ratio was significantly lower and the RFI was significantly higher than in non-azotaemic dogs infected with B. canis. The calculated correlation between RFI and duration of the disease before diagnosis and treatment was high, positive and statistically significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). The results of this study showed that during the course of canine babesiosis caused by B. canis in Poland acute tubular necrosis may develop.

Keywords

Acute tubular necrosis azotaemia Babesia canis canine babesiosis renal failure index urinary creatinine to serum creatinine ratio 

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Copyright information

© Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wojciech Zygner
    • 1
  • Olga Gójska-Zygner
    • 2
  • Agnieszka Wesołowska
    • 3
  • Halina Wędrychowicz
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineWarsaw University of Life Sciences — SGGWWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Center of Small Animal Health Clinic MultiwetWarsawPoland
  3. 3.W. Stefański Institute of ParasitologyWarsawPoland

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