Acta Parasitologica

, Volume 58, Issue 2, pp 215–217 | Cite as

Excretory/secretory products of Fasciola hepatica but not recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase induce death of human hepatocyte cells

  • Piotr Bąska
  • Luke J. Norbury
  • Marcin Wiśniewski
  • Kamil Januszkiewicz
  • Halina Wędrychowicz
Research Note
  • 184 Downloads

Abstract

The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica infects a wide range of hosts, and has a considerable impact on the agriculture industry, mainly through infections of sheep and cattle. Further, human infection is now considered of public health importance and is hyperendemic in some regions. The fluke infection causes considerable damage to the hosts’ liver. However, the mechanisms of liver destruction have not yet been completely elucidated. In the present report we incubated a human liver cell line in the presence of either F. hepatica excretory/secretory material (FhES) or recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase (FhPGK). Dosedependent cytotoxicity in the presence of FhES was observed, indicating that FhES is capable of killing human hepatocytes, supporting a role for FhES in damaging host liver cells during infection; while treatment with a recombinant intracellular protein — FhPGK, had no impact on cell survival.

Keywords

Human hepatocyte F. hepatica ES recombinant FhPGK 

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Copyright information

© Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Piotr Bąska
    • 1
  • Luke J. Norbury
    • 2
  • Marcin Wiśniewski
    • 3
  • Kamil Januszkiewicz
    • 2
    • 4
  • Halina Wędrychowicz
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineWarsaw University of Life Sciences — SGGWWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Witold Stefański Institute of ParasitologyPolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland
  3. 3.Division of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary MedicineWarsaw University of Life Sciences — SGGWWarsawPoland
  4. 4.Central Forensic Laboratory of the PoliceWarsawPoland

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