Acta Parasitologica

, Volume 58, Issue 2, pp 198–206 | Cite as

Evaluation of the immune response of male and female rats vaccinated with cDNA encoding a cysteine proteinase of Fasciola hepatica (FhPcW1)

  • Agnieszka Wesołowska
  • Luke J. Norbury
  • Kamil Januszkiewicz
  • Luiza Jedlina
  • Sławomir Jaros
  • Anna Zawistowska-Deniziak
  • Wojciech Zygner
  • Halina Wędrychowicz
Article

Abstract

Not only do males and females of many species vary in their responses to certain parasitic infections, but also to treatments such as vaccines. However, there are very few studies investigating differences among sexes following vaccination and infection. Here we demonstrate that female Sprague-Dawley rats vaccinated with cDNA encoding a recently discovered cysteine proteinase of Fasciola hepatica (FhPcW1) develop considerably lower liver fluke burdens after F. hepatica infection than their male counterparts. This is accompanied by differences in the course of their immune responses which involve different eosinophil and monocyte responses throughout the study as well as humoral responses. It is evident that host gender influences the outcome of parasitic infections after vaccination and research on both sexes should be considered when developing new treatments against parasites.

Keywords

Fasciola hepatica sex differences DNA vaccination immunology cysteine proteases 

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Copyright information

© Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agnieszka Wesołowska
    • 1
  • Luke J. Norbury
    • 1
  • Kamil Januszkiewicz
    • 1
  • Luiza Jedlina
    • 1
  • Sławomir Jaros
    • 1
  • Anna Zawistowska-Deniziak
    • 1
  • Wojciech Zygner
    • 2
  • Halina Wędrychowicz
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Parasitology, W. Stefański Institute of ParasitologyPolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Division of Parasitology, Department of Preclinical SciencesWarsaw University of Life SciencesWarsawPoland

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