Acta Parasitologica

, Volume 57, Issue 4, pp 402–405 | Cite as

Molecular identification of Trichinella britovi in martens (Martes martes) and badgers (Meles meles); new host records in Poland

  • Bożena Moskwa
  • Katarzyna Goździk
  • Justyna Bień
  • Marek Bogdaszewski
  • Władysław Cabaj
Research Note

Abstract

Trichinella larvae were detected in a marten (Martes martes) and a badger (Meles meles) in Poland. The animals were found dead following car accidents. All examined animals derived from the Mazurian Lake district, north-east Poland, near the village Kosewo Górne where Trichinella infection were earlier confirmed in wildlife; red foxes and wild boars. The muscle samples were examined by artificial pepsin-HCl digestion method. The parasites were identified as Trichinella britovi by multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. Larvae were found in two out of three martens and one out of seven examined badgers. This is the first report of the identification of Trichinella britovi larvae from martens and badgers in Poland.

Keywords

Trichinella britovi marten badger PCR Poland 

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Copyright information

© Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bożena Moskwa
    • 1
  • Katarzyna Goździk
    • 1
  • Justyna Bień
    • 1
  • Marek Bogdaszewski
    • 1
  • Władysław Cabaj
    • 1
  1. 1.Witold Stefański Institute of Parasitology of the Polish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland

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