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Central European Journal of Medicine

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 663–666 | Cite as

Regressive changes in phaeochromocytomas and paroxysmal hypertension

  • Ryszard Pogorzelski
  • Sadegh Toutounchi
  • Patryk Fiszer
  • Ewa Krajewska
  • Barbara Górnicka
  • Łukasz ZapałaEmail author
  • Małgorzata M. Szostek
  • Wawrzyniec Jakuczun
  • Robert Tworus
  • Tomasz Wołoszko
  • Maciej Skórski
Research Article
  • 36 Downloads

Abstract

Introduction

Pheochromocytomas may cause life-threatening episodes of arterial hypertension and surgical treatment is obligatory following proper general medical preparation.

Material and methods

There were 63 patients in years 2006–2011 operated in the department due to pheochromocytoma. The group comprised 38 women and 25 men of the age range 16–80, mean 44,7. All the specimen were analyzed in pathological examination. The regressive changes that were found were subsequently compared with the clinical course of the pheochromocytoma both in the preoperative period and at the time of the surgery.

Results

There were 44 laparoscopic adrenalectomies performed, out of which 5 resulted in conversions to open surgery, while 19 patients were operated primarily via open access. The indications for the open procedures: extraadrenal tumors, fibrotic-infiltrative lesions suggestive of malignancy, vast intratumoral extravasation, and respiratory failure. In all the postoperative specimens pheochromocytomas were found. In 29 cases intratumoral haemorrhages were observed, in 17 — tumoral necrosis at different stages, and in 3 cases posthaemorrhagic cystis. In 6 cases the lesions were accompanied by major fibrosis and hyalinization.

Conclusions

There is a statistically significant relationship between regressive changes observed within phaeochromocytomas and a reduction of paroxysmal hypertension at the time of adrenalectomy (p=0,012).

Keywords

Pheochromocytoma Paroxysmal hypertension Regressive changes in pheochromocytoma 

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Copyright information

© Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryszard Pogorzelski
    • 1
  • Sadegh Toutounchi
    • 1
  • Patryk Fiszer
    • 1
  • Ewa Krajewska
    • 1
  • Barbara Górnicka
    • 1
  • Łukasz Zapała
    • 2
    Email author
  • Małgorzata M. Szostek
    • 1
  • Wawrzyniec Jakuczun
    • 1
  • Robert Tworus
    • 1
  • Tomasz Wołoszko
    • 1
  • Maciej Skórski
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinic of General and Thoracic SurgeryMedical University of Warsaw.WarsawPoland
  2. 2.Department of UrologyMultidisciplinary Hospital Warsaw-MiedzylesieWarsawPoland

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