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Central European Journal of Medicine

, Volume 8, Issue 5, pp 679–684 | Cite as

MCP-1 and fetuin A levels in patients with PCOS and/or obesity before and after metformin treatment

  • Antoaneta Gateva
  • Zdravko Kamenov
  • Adelina Tsakova
Research Article

Abstract

Background/Aims

The aim of the study was to investigate MCP-1 and fetuin A levels in women with PCOS and/or obesity before and after metformin treatment.

Materials/Methods

In the study consisted of 59 patients. Anthropometric measurements and biochemical tests, including MCP-1 and fetuin A measurement, were performed. For patients that were diagnosed with insulin resistance and started metformin treatment all the laboratory tests and anthropometric measurements were repeated after 6 months.

Results

MCP-1 and fetuin A levels did not differ between patients with obesity with and without PCOS, between patients with PCOS with and without obesity, insulin resistance, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia or menstrual disturbances. MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with hyperandrogenemia than in patients without (456.3±141.1pmol/L vs. 372.5±108.5 pmol/L), while fetuin A levels were significantly higher in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) than in patients without MetS (278.5±41.1 mcg/ml vs. 240.0±42.0 mcg/ml). There was no significant change in MCP-1 and fetuin A levels after of metformin treatment.

Conclusions

MCP- 1 levels are higher in patients with hyperandrogenemia and fetiun A levels are higher in patients with metabolic syndrome. MCP-1 and fetuin A levels do not change significantly after metformin treatment.

Keywords

Atherosclerosis Cardiovascular risk Metabolic syndrome 

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Copyright information

© Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antoaneta Gateva
    • 1
  • Zdravko Kamenov
    • 1
  • Adelina Tsakova
    • 2
  1. 1.Clinic of EndocrinologyUniversity Hospital Alexandrovska, Medical UniversitySofiaBulgaria
  2. 2.Central clinical laboratoryUniversity Hospital Alexandrovska, Medical UniversitySofiaBulgaria

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