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Effects of kinesio taping in a physical therapist with acute low back pain due to patient handling: A case report

  • Gak Hwang-Bo
  • Jung-Hoon LeeEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

Objectives

The paper describes the case of a physical therapist with acute Low Back Pain (LBP) due to patient handling and the efficacy of Kinesio Taping (KT) around the trunk in the treatment of this occupational LBP. Materials and

Methods

KT was applied around the trunk for 3 days, for an average of 10 h/day. Kinesio tape was applied with 130–140% stretch to the rectus abdominis, internal oblique, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi muscles, which are activated in the process of lifting.

Results

Following the KT application, the ‘Visual Analog Scale’ and ‘Oswestry Disability Questionnaire scores’ gradually decreased and active trunk range of motion limited by the LBP increased progressively. The physical therapist no longer complained of LBP and was able to handle patients without any pain.

Conclusions

Hence, continuous application of KT around the trunk may be a supplementary treatment method for acute LBP in physical therapists and enable continuous patient handling without any loss of work time due to occupational LBP. In addition, KT may also be applicable for the prevention and treatment of occupational LBP in other professions involving lifting heavy objects.

Key words

Low back pain Occupations Patient lifting Patient transfers 

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Copyright information

© © Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Physical Therapy, College of Rehabilitation ScienceDaegu UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Physical TherapyInje University, Pusan Paik HospitalBusanRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Physical TherapyInje University, Pusan Paik HospitalBusanRepublic of Korea

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