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Chemical Papers

, Volume 68, Issue 5, pp 633–637 | Cite as

Synthesis and properties of CaAl-layered double hydroxides of hydrocalumite-type

  • Viktor Tóth
  • Mónika Sipiczki
  • Attila Pallagi
  • Ákos Kukovecz
  • Zoltán Kónya
  • Pál Sipos
  • István Pálinkó
Original Paper

Abstract

CaAl-layered double hydroxides (CaAl-LDHs) with various carbonate ion contents are essentially formed in Bayer liquors during the causticisation step in alumina production. Under well-defined conditions hemicarbonate is formed, which is beneficial in the process of retrieving both Al(OH) 4 and OH ions. In the current work, Ca2Al-LDHs with various carbonate contents were prepared by the co-precipitation procedure and the products were dried in different ways. Structural information was obtained by a variety of methods, such as X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Elemental maps were constructed through a combination of SEM images and EDX measurements. The targeted CaAl-hydrocalumites were successfully synthesised. It was found that the method used for drying did not influence the basal spacing although it significantly altered the particle sizes.

Keywords

CaAl-LDH synthesis drying methods structural characterization 

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Copyright information

© Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Viktor Tóth
    • 1
  • Mónika Sipiczki
    • 2
  • Attila Pallagi
    • 2
  • Ákos Kukovecz
    • 3
    • 4
  • Zoltán Kónya
    • 4
    • 5
  • Pál Sipos
    • 2
  • István Pálinkó
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Organic ChemistryUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  2. 2.Department of Inorganic and Analytical ChemistryUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  3. 3.MTA-SZTE ”Lendület” Porous Nanocomposites Research Group, SzegedSzegedHungary
  4. 4.Department of Applied and Environmental ChemistryUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  5. 5.MTA-SZTE Reaction Kinetics and Surface Chemistry Research GroupSzegedHungary

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