Acta Parasitologica

, Volume 55, Issue 4, pp 392–398 | Cite as

Anhemialges bakeri sp. nov. (Analgoidea, Analgidae) — a new species of feather mite from the Common Chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita (Passeriformes, Sylviidae) from England

Article

Abstract

A new species of the poorly known feather mite genus Anhemialges Gaud, 1958 is described from the Common Chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita. Anhemialges bakeri sp. nov. differs from all other species of the genus by the shape of setae w and s on tarsi III, which are hair-like and slightly thickened in basal and median parts. In all other described species of Anhemialges, setae w and s on tarsi III are blade-like or shaped as thick spines. The lack of leg III hypertrophy is discussed and interpreted as characteristic feature of the species rather than male homeomorphy. Remarks about the recent and possible species richness of the genus Anhemialges are given.

Keywords

Anhemialges passerine birds male polymorphism host-symbiont relationships 

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Copyright information

© © Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Animal Morphology, Faculty of BiologyAdam Mickiewicz UniversityPoznańPoland
  2. 2.WakefieldUK
  3. 3.Molecular Biology Techniques Laboratory, Faculty of BiologyAdam Mickiewicz UniversityPoznańPoland

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