Acta Parasitologica

, Volume 54, Issue 3, pp 194–196 | Cite as

Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii indirect fluorescent antibodies in naturally- and experimentally-infected chickens (Gallus domesticus) in Thailand

  • Kamlang Chumpolbanchorn
  • Pacharaporn Anankeatikul
  • Wantanee Ratanasak
  • Jitbanjong Wiengcharoen
  • R. C. Andrew Thompson
  • Yaowalark Sukthana
Article

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii infections in free-range (FR) chickens (Gallus domesticus) are potential public health risks. Antibodies for T. gondii were found in 194 out of 303 serum samples (64.03%) from FR chickens in Thailand tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT, 1:16). To verify the validity of serologic data in this survey, sera from chickens experimentally infected with the RH strain of T. gondii were tested by the IFAT. Antibodies against T. gondii were detected as early as 7 days p.i., peaked at 2 weeks, and then declined by 10 weeks p.i.

Keywords

Toxoplasma gondii toxoplasmosis free-range chickens Gallus domesticus seroprevalence serodynamics 

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Copyright information

© © Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kamlang Chumpolbanchorn
    • 1
  • Pacharaporn Anankeatikul
    • 1
  • Wantanee Ratanasak
    • 1
  • Jitbanjong Wiengcharoen
    • 2
  • R. C. Andrew Thompson
    • 3
  • Yaowalark Sukthana
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Faculty of Veterinary ScienceMahidol UniversitySalaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon PathomThailand
  2. 2.Faculty of Veterinary MedicineMahanakorn University of TechnologyBangkokThailand
  3. 3.School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, Division of Health SciencesMurdoch UniversityPerthAustralia
  4. 4.Faculty of Tropical MedicineMahidol UniversityRatchathewi, BangkokThailand
  5. 5.Mahidol University International CollegeMahidol UniversitySalaya, Phuttamonthon, Nakhon PathomThailand

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