Central European Journal of Biology

, Volume 5, Issue 5, pp 641–648 | Cite as

Antibacterial effect of essential oils and interaction with food components

  • Rentsenkhand Tserennadmid
  • Miklós Takó
  • László Galgóczy
  • Tamás Papp
  • Csaba Vágvölgyi
  • László Gerő
  • Judit Krisch
Research Article

Abstract

The antibacterial effect of essential oils (EOs) derived from Citrus lemon, Juniperus communis, Origanum majorana, and Salvia sclarea, was investigated either alone or in combination, on 2 food related bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli). The influence of food ingredients — hydrolyzed proteins originating from animal and plant (meat extract and soy peptone) and sucrose — on the antibacterial effect of EOs was also tested. The most effective antibacterial activities were obtained with marjoram and clary sage oil, alone and in combination. High concentration of meat extract protected the bacteria from the growth inhibiting effect of marjoram oil, while soy peptone had no such effect. Sucrose intensified the lag phase lengthening by marjoram oil in a dose-independent manner.

Keywords

Essential oils Food ingredients Growth rate Lag phase 

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Copyright information

© © Versita Warsaw and Springer-Verlag Wien 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rentsenkhand Tserennadmid
    • 1
  • Miklós Takó
    • 2
  • László Galgóczy
    • 2
  • Tamás Papp
    • 2
  • Csaba Vágvölgyi
    • 2
  • László Gerő
    • 3
  • Judit Krisch
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of BiologyMongolian Academy of SciencesUlaanbaatar-51Mongolia
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science and InformaticsUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  3. 3.Institute of Food Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary

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