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Behaviormetrika

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 185–204 | Cite as

On the Sampling Distribution of Swap-Rate

  • Kenichi KikuchiEmail author
  • Shin-ichi Mayekawa
Article
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

When we are to select students using the result of an entrance examination, it is common to select N0 students out of N applicants on the basis of a composite score of m subtests, where N0, the number of students to be selected, is determined prior to the administration of the entrance examination. The swap-rate is an intuitively easy-tounderstand measure of the contribution of each subtest to the selection. The swap rate of the j-th test is defined as the proportion, to No, of the number of students who failed to pass the examination if the j-th test is not used for the selection.

In this paper we first discuss the sampling distribution of the swap-rate under the normality assumption and then show the result of a bootstrapping using real selection data.

Key Words

swap-rate university admission entrance examination Monte-Carlo method bootstrap method 

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Copyright information

© The Behaviormetric Society 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research DivisionThe National Center for University Entrance ExaminationsTokyoJapan

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