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Breast Cancer

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 322–327 | Cite as

Primary Breast mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (malt) lymphoma with high-grade transformation evidenced by prominent lymphoepithelial lesions

  • Yoshinori Taeda
  • Naohiro Ariga
  • Kayoko Okamura
  • Naoko Takei
  • Takuya Komeno
  • Hamaiti Ueki
  • Haruo Ohtani
Case Report

Abstract

Primary breast lymphoma, particularly primary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, is a rare disease. We report here a case of a MALT lymphoma of the breast with high-grade transformation. An 84-year-old woman presented with a Pagetoid mass in her right breast. After a clinical diagnosis of breast cancer, T2N1M0, stage IIB, she underwent mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection. She had no history of autoimmune disease such as Hashimoto thyroiditis or Sjogren disease. Pathologically the tumor tissue was composed of small to large lymphoid cells. The large cells contained a considerable number of centroblasts, forming a sheet-like proliferation centrally. Among the small cells many small cleaved cells were present, which were more predominant in the peripheral areas. Immunohistochemistry revealed that these cells were positive for CD20 and CD79a. The tumor cells infiltrated the ductular epithelial cells, distorting the duct structures, to form lymphoepithelial lesions. Immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin and CD20 was helpful for identification. No germinal centers were formed. MALT lymphoma with high-grade transformation was diagnosed. Rituximab (anti-CD20 antibody) was prescribed as systemic treatment without chemotherapy or irradiation. After 18 months, no tumor recurrence was observed. We emphasize the importance of lymphoepithelial lesions for the diagnosis of MALT lymphoma of the breast.

Key words

Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma Primary breast lymphoma Autoimmune disease Lymphoepithelial lesions 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Breast Cancer Society 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshinori Taeda
    • 1
  • Naohiro Ariga
    • 1
  • Kayoko Okamura
    • 1
  • Naoko Takei
    • 2
  • Takuya Komeno
    • 2
  • Hamaiti Ueki
    • 1
  • Haruo Ohtani
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of SurgeryNational Hospital OrganizationJapan
  2. 2.Departments of HematologyNational Hospital OrganizationJapan
  3. 3.Departments of Pathology, Mito Medical CenterNational Hospital OrganizationJapan

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