Demography

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 421–434 | Cite as

Contraceptive use in South Africa under apartheid

Determinants and Consequences of Fertility

Abstract

In this paper, patterns of contraceptive use among black South African women in the late 1980s are examined. Multilevel logit models are used to evaluate the extent to which segregation of the African population into homelands gave rise to uneven patterns of contraceptive use; how this pattern was shaped by variations in family-planning acceptability; and the way in which the system of male labor migration and social and economic inequities across communities affected women's use of contraceptives. Results show that variation in contraceptive use across homeland areas diminished with the addition of community controls for development and migration. Controlling for unobserved heterogeneity indicated that localized conditions could offset the advantages or disadvantages of living in a former homeland.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Population CouncilPolicy Research DivisionNew York

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