The impact of child care on fertility in urban Thailand

Abstract

Women’s labor force participation in Thailand, particularly in the modem sector, recently has increased in conjunction with rapid declines in fertility. This paper examines whether a relationship exists between child care considerations and fertility decision making among Bangkok women. Although the two-child family has become the norm in recent years, and although most respondents said that ideally they would like to have two children, a high proportion of women surveyed said they planned to only have one child. Women’s work status and type of employment is found to strongly affect the likelihood of having a second birth: those who work at jobs that not only are low-paying but are located in a formal setting are least likely to have a second child. The type of child care for the first child also has an impact: those whose first child is in a less preferred situation are less likely to have a second. Variables measuring the need for and type of child care are found to have greater consequences for fertility than do usual measures of socioeconomic status.

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Richter, K., Podhisita, C., Chamratrithirong, A. et al. The impact of child care on fertility in urban Thailand. Demography 31, 651–662 (1994). https://doi.org/10.2307/2061797

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Keywords

  • Child Care
  • Family Business
  • Provide Child Care
  • Event History Analysis
  • Child Care Cost