Cohort trends in the lifetime distribution of female family headship in the United States, 1968–1985

An Erratum to this article was published on 01 November 1995

Abstract

We use the PSID Relationship File to estimate cohort trends in the lifetime incidence and duration of female family headship. Hazard (event-history) techniques are used to estimate movements into and out of headship, accounting for duration dependence and left-censored spells. The mean number of years spent in headship between ages 14 and 59 rose dramatically over the period. The increase arose from an increased number of headship spells, including an increase in the number of women ever experiencing headship, but not at all from an increase in durations of headship spells; those decreased slightly.

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Correspondence to Robert A. Moffitt.

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An erratum to this article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF03208318.

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Moffitt, R.A., Rendall, M.S. Cohort trends in the lifetime distribution of female family headship in the United States, 1968–1985. Demography 32, 407–424 (1995). https://doi.org/10.2307/2061688

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Keywords

  • Female Headship
  • Exit Rate
  • Lifetime Distribution
  • Duration Dependence
  • Marital Disruption