To what extent does breastfeeding explain Birth-interval effects on early childhood mortality?

Abstract

This article shows that in Nepal breastfeeding almost completely explains the effects of following birth interval on childhood mortality during the first 18 months of age and partially explains the effect of following birth interval on childhood mortality between 18 and 60 months of age. Breastfeeding does not explain the effect of preceding birth interval on childhood mortality. The analysis is based on an application of hazard models to data from the 1976 Nepal Fertility Survey.

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Retherford, R.D., Choe, M.K., Thapa, S. et al. To what extent does breastfeeding explain Birth-interval effects on early childhood mortality?. Demography 26, 439–450 (1989). https://doi.org/10.2307/2061603

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Keywords

  • Infant Mortality
  • Childhood Mortality
  • Birth Interval
  • Child Survival
  • Index Child