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American fertility in transition: New estimates of birth rates in the United States, 1900–1910

Abstract

This article presents new estimates of age-specific overall and marital fertility rates for the entire United States for the period 1900‐1910. The estimation techniques are the two-census parity increment method and the own-children method. The data sources are the 1900 census public use sample and tabulations of 1910 census fertility data published with the 1940 census. Estimates are made for the total population, whites, native-born whites, foreign-born whites, and blacks. Low age-specific marital fertility at younger ages is consistent with a view of a distinctive American fertility pattern at this time.

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Haines, M.R. American fertility in transition: New estimates of birth rates in the United States, 1900–1910. Demography 26, 137–148 (1989). https://doi.org/10.2307/2061500

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Keywords

  • Total Fertility Rate
  • Marital Fertility
  • Natural Fertility
  • Differential Fertility
  • Spacing Behavior