Religious Differentials in Reproduction: the Effects of Sectarian Education

Abstract

College-educated Catholic women in the 1976 National Survey of Family Growth had higher actual and expected fertility than did college educated Protestants. Moreover, Catholic colleges or universities had a pronatalist effect on alumnae. Thus, a significant part of the higher Catholic than Protestant cumulative fertility among college-educated women arose from the greater propensity of such Catholics to attend sectarian schools and colleges. The implications are explored.

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Johnson, N.E. Religious Differentials in Reproduction: the Effects of Sectarian Education. Demography 19, 495–509 (1982). https://doi.org/10.2307/2061015

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Keywords

  • Sectarian Education
  • Family Growth
  • Sectarian School
  • Cumulative Fertility
  • Marital Fertility Rate