Childbearing and family in remarriage

Abstract

Proportional hazards models are used to test hypotheses about the effect of women’s prior childbearing on the probability of having a birth in remarriage and to analyze the effects of other factors. Results indicate that the number of children at the time of remarriage has no effect on childbearing probabilities, but the age of the youngest child has a significant effect. These findings support the view that having a child is important to confirm the marriage, but that individual and family life course factors also affect the decision to have a child in a remarriage.

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Griffith, J.D., Koo, H.P. & Suchindran, C.M. Childbearing and family in remarriage. Demography 22, 73–88 (1985). https://doi.org/10.2307/2060987

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Keywords

  • Young Child
  • Life Table
  • Birth Interval
  • Marital History
  • Noncustodial Parent