The impact of international migration upon the timing of marriage and childbearing

Abstract

Experiences of 1500 native-born Australians and 1000 foreign-born immigrants to Australia, surveyed in Melbourne in 1971, reveal that immigration delayed marriage for migrants arriving between age 15 and marriage, and delayed first, second, third and fourth births for immigrants arriving during each birth interval. This migration effect was clearly finite in its influence, affecting only proximate vital events rather than persisting through several successive events. The temporary nature of the migration effect highlights the adaptability of international migrants.

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Carlson, E.D. The impact of international migration upon the timing of marriage and childbearing. Demography 22, 61–72 (1985). https://doi.org/10.2307/2060986

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Keywords

  • International Migration
  • Birth Interval
  • Migration Effect
  • Vital Event
  • Childless Woman