Some sources of error and their effect on census statistics

Abstract

Often the reliability of survey data is examined only in relationship to sampling variances, excluding many other potential sources of error. If the sampling variance dominates the mean-square error, then few mistakes result by considering sampling variance only; however, if sampling variance is only a small part of the mean-square error, serious mistakes in inference could be made. The Bureau of the Census has developed a model describing the joint effect of sampling and nonsampling errors on census statistics. This article shows how a study of the components of error may lead to methods of improving the accuracy and reliability of survey data.

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Ballar, B.A. Some sources of error and their effect on census statistics. Demography 13, 273–286 (1976). https://doi.org/10.2307/2060806

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Keywords

  • Sampling Variance
  • Current Population Survey
  • Simple Response
  • Correlate Component
  • International Statistical Institute