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Demography

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 209–222 | Cite as

The influence of women’s work opportunities on marriage rates

  • Samuel H. Preston
  • Alan Thomas Richards
Articles

Abstract

Several authors have argued that increased work opportunities for women have helped to produce a reduction in the average age at marriage in the United States. This paper tests this proposition on data for the 100 largest SMSA’s in 1960. Using ordinary least-squares regression, we find that areas of relatively attractive female employment opportunities had relatively low proportions of women ever married in the age interval 22–24. Other variables significantly related to the proportion married in an SMSA are its sex ratio, percent Catholic, and number of inhabitants. A decline in the sex ratio and improvements in female employment opportunities appear to have been equally influential in producing declines in proportions married between 1960 and 1970.

Keywords

Government Printing Marriage Rate Marital Fertility Work Opportunity Median Earning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel H. Preston
    • 1
  • Alan Thomas Richards
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, Department of SociologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattle

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