Effects of migration on the educational levels of the black resident population at the origin and destination, 1955–1960 and 1965–1970

Abstract

Using the 1960 and 1970 census data, this paper analyzes the net effects of the interregional migration of black males on the educational levels of the resident black male population at the regions of origin and destination. Significant variations are observed in the educational selectivity of outmigrants from each region, by region of destination. Comparing the educational levels of the return migrants to the South with those of the resident population in the nonsouthern regions provides no evidence that the return migrants are "failed" migrants. The net effect of interregional migration on the educational levels of the black male resident population at the regions of origin and destination is insignificant in most age groups, for both the 1955–1960 and 1965–1970 periods. In particular, in-migration from the South to nonsouthern regions has little effect on the educational levels of the resident population in most age groups. In fact, for nonsouthern regions, out-migration is more detrimental to the educational level of the resident black male population than is in-migration from the South. Furthermore, the net effect of interregional migration has declined from the 1955–1960 period to the 1965–1970 period.

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Shin, EH. Effects of migration on the educational levels of the black resident population at the origin and destination, 1955–1960 and 1965–1970. Demography 15, 41–56 (1978). https://doi.org/10.2307/2060489

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Keywords

  • Educational Level
  • Black Male
  • High School Graduate
  • Resident Population
  • North Central