Annexation as a factor in the growth of U.S. cities, 1950–1960 and 1960–1970

Abstract

The incidence of annexation, the growth in the original area and in the area annexed, and the proportion of growth due to annexation between 1950 and 1970 are analyzed for U.S. cities grouped by size, metropolitan status, and region of the country. Over this period, annexation was a principal means of population growth for incorporated places outside the Northeast. Though often associated with metropolitan growth, annexation was even more important in the growth of nonmetropolitan cities. Overall growth differences by size of place, metropolitan status, and decade (1950–1960 or 1960–1970) could not be explained by the incidence and nature of annexation.

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Klaff, V.Z., Fuguitt, G.V. Annexation as a factor in the growth of U.S. cities, 1950–1960 and 1960–1970. Demography 15, 1–12 (1978). https://doi.org/10.2307/2060487

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Keywords

  • Metropolitan Area
  • Central City
  • Population Change
  • Total Growth
  • Initial Area