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Hawk migration over white marsh, Maryland

Abstract

The average number of hawks observed per hour in autumn migration between 1951–1954 and 1958–1961 at White Marsh, Maryland, was compared. The counts indicated that the status of the ten species observed may be divided into three categories: (1) relatively stable species (red-tailed hawk), (2) declining species (sparrow hawk, red-shouldered hawk, osprey, marsh hawk, and broad-winged hawk), and (3) rapidly declining species (peregrine falcon, Cooper’s hawk, bald eagle, and sharp-shinned hawk). The findings from this study are in agreement with the available literature and the status of the populations appears to be related to the food habits of the species.

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Technical paper No. 2899. Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station, Corvallis, Oregon.

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Hackman, C.D., Henny, C.J. Hawk migration over white marsh, Maryland. Chesapeake Science 12, 137–141 (1971). https://doi.org/10.2307/1350773

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Keywords

  • Autumn Migration
  • Bald Eagle
  • Peregrine Falcon
  • Fall Migration
  • Migratory Bird Population