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Demography

, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 323–333 | Cite as

Ethnic stratification in Northwest China: Occupational differences between Han Chinese and national minorities in Xinjiang, 1982–1990

  • Emily HannumEmail author
  • Yu Xie
Labor Force, Mortality, and Aging in Asia

Abstract

The debate on market reforms and social stratification in China has paid very little attention to China’s ethnic minorities. We explored rising occupational stratification by ethnicity in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Analyses of census data from 1982 and 1990 pointed to educational disadvantages faced by ethnic minorities as the most plausible explanation for the change. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant increase in the effect of education on high-status occupational attainment but no change in the effect of ethnicity. Net of education, ethnic differences in high-status occupational attainment were negligible. In contrast, large ethnic differences in manufacturing and agricultural occupations persisted after education and geography were statistically controlled.

Keywords

Ethnic Difference Senior High School National Minority Occupational Attainment Occupational Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Harvard Graduate School of Education and Harvard Institute for International DevelopmentCambridge
  2. 2.Sociology Department and Population Studies CenterUniversity of MichiganMichganUSA

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