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Demography

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 115–124 | Cite as

Intergenerational relations in urban China: Proximity, contact, and help to parents

  • Fuqin Bian
  • John R. Logan
  • Yanjie Bian
Family and Household

Abstract

Although most older Chinese parents live with an adult son or daughter, most adult offspring do not live with parents. We examine the relations of these noncoresident offspring with parents in terms of proximity, frequency of contact, and exchange of help. Based on a 1993 random sample survey conducted in two major Chinese cities, we find that although rates of coresidence are high, noncoresident sons and daughters live close to parents, have frequent contact with their parents, and provide regular help to parents. Relationships with noncoresident sons and daughters are unaffected by whether parents coreside with another child. There is some evidence of closer relationships with sons than with daughters, but parents without a son receive as much help from all children as do parents with sons. The effects of these and other predictors are estimated in multivariate analyses, and results are interpreted in terms of the persistence or change of traditional family norms.

Keywords

Adult Child Married Couple Chinese Family Adult Offspring Intergenerational Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fuqin Bian
    • 1
  • John R. Logan
    • 1
  • Yanjie Bian
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologySUNY at AlbanyAlbany
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of MinnesotaUSA

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