Demography

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 395–399

The accuracy of survey-reported marital status: Evidence from survey records matched to social security records

Article

Abstract

Researchers have concluded that divorced persons often fail to report accurate marital information in surveys. I revisit this issue using surveys matched exactly to Social Security data. Older divorced persons frequently misreport their marital status, but there is evidence that the misreporting is unintentional. I offer some suggestions on how surveys can be improved.

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References

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Economic ResearchSocial Security AdministrationWashington, DC

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