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Demography

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 565–580 | Cite as

A description of the extreme aged population based on improved medicare enrollment data

  • Bert Kestenbaum
Mortality

Abstract

The mortality and size of the extreme aged population can be studied most accurately with Medicare enrollment data from the Social Security Administration’s Master Beneficiary Record after certain types of questionable records are eliminated. With the improved data base we find that mortality rates at the very old ages are higher than published rates, we are more confident of the reality of the race crossover, and we can estimate the number of centenarians more accurately. Furthermore, a large matched-records study shows close agreement on age at death between the Master Beneficiary Record and the death certificate.

Keywords

Social Security Death Certificate Social Security Number Social Security Benefit Mortality Crossover 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bert Kestenbaum
    • 1
  1. 1.Social Security AdministrationOffice of the ActuaryBaltimore

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