Demography

, Volume 32, Issue 2, pp 281–297

Sharing a Home: The Experiences of American Women and Their Parents over the Twentieth Century

  • Robin M. Weinick
Article

Abstract

Trends and determinants of daughter-parent coresidence over the twentieth century are examined by using the 1987-1988 National Survey of Families and Households. Young women from more recent birth cohorts leave their parents’ homes for the first time at earlier ages, but are more likely to make return trips home than those born earlier. Thus cohorts show remarkable consistency in the proportion of life lived in the parental home. For the 1900-1929 birth cohorts, daughters’ lifetime probability that a parent will move in with them is approximately 15%; younger cohorts show similar age-specific probabilities to date. Explanations for these trends are considered.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin M. Weinick
    • 1
  1. 1.Agency for Health Care Policy and ResearchRockville

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