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Demography

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 411–429 | Cite as

The new census question about ancestry: What did it tell us?

  • Reynolds Farley
Ethnicity and Race

Abstract

In addition to specific inquiries about race and Spanish origin, the censuses of 1980 and 1990 included an open-ended question about ancestry, which replaced the question about parents’ place of birth that had been used since 1870. This paper examines findings from the new ancestry question from the perspective of measuring ethnicity. The question adds little information about Hispanics, racial minorities, or recent immigrants, who can be identified readily on the basis of other census inquiries. The ancestry question allows us to characterize the descendants of European immigrants, but because of ethnic intermarriage, the numerous generations that separate present respondents from their forebears, and the apparent unimportance of ancestry to many whites of European origin, responses appear quite inconsistent. In regard to these groups, we may now be in an era of optional ethnicity, in which no simple census question will distinguish those who identify strongly with a specific European group from those who report symbolic or imagined ethnicity.

Keywords

Census Bureau Current Population Survey Racial Minority Residential Segregation Ancestry Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reynolds Farley
    • 1
  1. 1.Population Studies CenterThe University of MichiganAnn Arbor

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