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Demography

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 103–122 | Cite as

The use of hypothetical cohorts in estimating demographic parameters under conditions of changing fertility and mortality

  • Hania Zlotnik
  • Kenneth Hill
Article

Abstract

The indirect methods of demographic estimation available to date are often inadequate to estimate levels in the presence of trends. The use of measures relative to hypothetical cohorts to minimize the effectsoftrends and estimate period levels is described. Procedures allowing the estimation of intersurvey levels of fertility, child mortality and adult mortality are illustrated using data from Thailand and Peru.

Keywords

Average Parity Vital Rate Hypothetical Cohort Constant Fertility Model Life Table 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hania Zlotnik
    • 1
  • Kenneth Hill
    • 1
  1. 1.National Academy of SciencesWashington, D.C.

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