Demography

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 1–17 | Cite as

Interstate migrants in the United States: Some social-economic differences by type of move

  • Ann R. Miller
Articles

Abstract

U.S. interstate migrants (over a five-year period) are separated into three groups: (a) those leaving state of birth; (b) those returning to state of birth; and (c) those outside state of birth at the beginning of the period and moving on to a third state by the end. Evidence is presented suggesting that the third group is particularly selective of persons with high social and economic status. The findings are linked to certain hypotheses about the changing role and function of migration in a highly developed country where the transition from a rural society based on agriculture has essentially been completed.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann R. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Population Studies CenterUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia

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