Chesapeake Science

, Volume 13, Supplement 1, pp S137–S144 | Cite as

Current status of the knowledge of the biological effects of suspended and deposited sediments in Chesapeake Bay

  • J. Albert Sherk
Article

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Copyright information

© Estuarine Research Federation 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Albert Sherk
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Research Natural Resources InstituteUniversity of Maryland Hallowing Point Field StationPrince Frederick

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