Drug Safety

, Volume 32, Issue 10, pp 875–993 | Cite as

International Society of Pharmacovigilance

Abstracts 9th ISoP Annual Meeting ‘From Pharmacovigilance to Risk Management’ Reims, France 6–9 October 2009
Abstracts

References

  1. 1.
    Lazarou J, Pomeranz BH, Corey PN. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in hospitalized patients: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. JAMA 1998; 279: 1200–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Einarson TR. Drug-related hospital admissions. Ann Pharmacother 1993; 27: 832–40PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Alesso L. Farmacovigilancia. Hacia una mayor seguridad en el uso de medicamentos. 1st ed. Cordoba, Argentina, 2007Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    McGettigan P, et al. Reporting of adverse drug reactions by hospital doctors and the response to intervention. Br J Clin Pharmacol 1997; 44(1): 98–100PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Smith CC, et al. Adverse drug reactions in a hospital general medical unit meriting notification to the Committee on Safety of Medicines. Br J Clin Pharmacol 1996; 42(4): 423–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bégaud B, et al. Rates of Spontaneous Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions in France. JAMA 2002; 288(13): 1588PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Sgro C, Clinard F, Ouazir K, et al. Incidence of drug-induced hepatic injuries: a population-based study. Hepatology 2002; 36(2): 451–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lee M. Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity. N Engl J Med 2003; 349: 474–85PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Patel H, Bell D, Molokhia M, et al. Trends in hospital admissions for adverse drug reactions in England: analysis of national hospital episode statistics 1998–2005. BMC Clin Pharmacol 2007; 7: 9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Brvar M, Fokter N, Bunc M, et al. The frequency of adverse drug reaction related admissions according to method of detection, admission urgency and medical department specialty. BMC Clinical Pharmacology 2009; 9: 8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pouyanne P, Haramburu F, Imbs JL, et al. Admissions to hospital caused by adverse drug reactions: cross sectional incidence study. BMJ 2000; 320: 1036PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Nordic Medico Statistical Committee 2004. Medicines Consumption in the Nordic Countries 1999–2003. At nomesco-eng.nom-nos.dkGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Garcáa del Pozo J, Ramos Sevillano E, de Abajo y Ramona Mateos Campos FJ. Utilización de antihipertensivos en España (1995–2001). Rev Esp Cardiol 2004; 57(3): 241–9CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Nordic Medico Statistical Committee 2004. Medicines Consumption in the Nordic Countries 1999–2003. At nomesco-eng.nom-nos.dkGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Agencia Española de Medicamentos y Productos Santiarios (AEMPS) y Dirección General de Farmacia y Productos Santiarios (DGFPS). Uso de antibióticos en España. En http://www.agemed.es/profHumana/observatorio/docs/Evo_uso_antibioticos96-06.pdf

References

  1. 1.
    Koshy A, Marcellin P, Martinot M, et al. Improved response to ribavirin interferon combination compared with interferon alone in patients with type 4 chronic hepatitis C without cirrhosis. Liver 2000; 20: 335–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Takai I, Katsuura J, Sadahira C, et al. A case of the generalized eruption occurred during combination therapy with peginterferon α-2b and ribavirin. Rinsho Hifuka 2006; 60: 789–92Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    McHutchinson JG, Gordon SC, Schiff ER, et al., for the Hepatitis Inteventional Therapy Group. Inteferon alfa- 2b alone or incombination with rebavirin as initial as treatment for chronic hepatitis C. N Engl J Med 1998; 339: 1485–92CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hashimoto Y, Kanto H, Itoh M. Adverse skin reactions due to pegylated interferon alpha 2b plus ribavirin combination therapy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C virus. Journal of Dermatology 2007; 34: 577–82PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Valesini G, Iannuccelli C, Marocchi E, et al. Biological and clinical effects of anti-TNFα treatment. Autoimmunity Rev 2007; 7: 35–41CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Day R. Adverse reactions of TNF-α inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis. Lancet 2002; 359: 540–1PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Montané E, Sallés M, Barriocanal A, et al. Antitumor necrosis factor-induced neutropenia: a case report with double positive rechallenges. Clin Rheumatol 2007; 26: 1527–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Keystone EC. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockade in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheum Dis Clin North Am 2001; 27: 427–43PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Hammoudeh M. Infliximab treatment in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis on haemodialysis. Rheumatology 2006; 45: 357–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    van der Hooft C, Jong G, Dieleman J, et al. Inappropriate drug prescribing in older adults: the updated 2002 Beers criteria - a population-based cohort study. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2005; 60(2): 137–44PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Brekke M, Rognstad S, Straand J, et al. Pharmacologically inappropriate prescriptions for elderly patients in general practice: how common? Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care 2008; 26: 80–1Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pugh M, Hanlon J, Zeber J, et al. Assesing potentially Inappropriate Prescribing in the Elderly Veterans Affairs Population Using the HEDIS 2006 Quality Measure. Journal of Managed Care Pharmacy 2006; 12(7): 537–45PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Dalakas MC. Peripheral neuropathy and antiretroviral drugs. J Peripher Nerv Syst 2001;6: 14–20PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lichtenstein KA, Armon C, Baron A, et al. Modification of the incidence of drug-associated symmetrical peripheral neuropathy by host and disease factors in the HIV outpatient study cohort. Clin Infect Dis 2005; 40(1): 148–57PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Moulignier A, Girard PM. Principaux traitements anti-VIH, Toxicité neurologique et interactions à éviter. Neurologie 2003; 4: 140–4Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    WHO. ARV drugs adverse events, case definition, grading, laboratory diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Geneva: WHO, 2008Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Aziz Z, Tey NP. Herbal medicines: prevalence and predictors of use among Malaysian adults. Complement Ther Med 2009; 17(1): 44–50PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Riewpaiboon A. Increasing herbal product consumption in Thailand. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2006; 15(9): 683–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Canadian Patient Safety Institute. The Safety Competencies. Ottawa Ontario, 2008Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Provnost PJ, et al. Reducing Health Care Hazards: Lessons From the Commercial Aviation Safety Team. Health Affairs 2009; 28(3): 479–89CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Seal C, Edwards B, Morrisroe J. Aviation Crew Resource Management (CRM) - A pharmacovigilance perspective. Pipeline 2008; (20): 7–9Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Edwards B. Using the Human Factor to improve PSUR quality and compliance. Jun 09, Annual DIA, San DiegoGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Institute of Medicine. To Err is Human. National Academy Press, 2000Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Dalton C, Keenan E, Stevenson V. A novel cause of intrathecal baclofen overdosage: lessons to be learnt. Clin Rehabil 2008; 22(2): 188–90PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Qweider M, Gilsbach JM, Rohde V. Inadvertent intrathecal vincristine administration: a neurosurgical emergency. Case report. J Neurosurg Spine 2007; 6(3): 280–3PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tournel G, Bécart-Robert A, Courtin P, et al. Fatal accidental intrathecal injection of vindesine. J Forensic Sci 2006; 51(5): 1166–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Barrett NA, Sundaraj SR. Inadvertent intrathecal injection of tramadol. Br J Anaesth 2003; 91(6): 918–20PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lazarou J, Pomeranz B, Corey P. Incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions in Hospitalized Patients. A Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies. JAMA 1998; 279(15): 1200–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Pirmohamed M, James S, Meakin S, et al. Adverse drug reaction as cause of admission to hospital: prospective analysis of 18 820 patients. BMJ 2004; 329: 15–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lagnaoui R, Moore N, Fach J, et al. Adverse drug reactions in a department of systemic diseases-oriented internal medicine: prevalence, incidence, direct costs and avoidability. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2000; 55: 181–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Moore N, Lecointre D, Noblet C, et al. Frequency and cost of serious adverse drug reactions in a department of general medicine. Br J Clin Pharmacol 1998; 45: 301–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Smith K, Leyden JJ. Safety of Doxycycline and Minocycline: A Systematic Review. Clin Ther 2005; 27: 1329–43PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Nadelman RB, Luger SW, Frank E, et al. Comparison of cefuroxime axetil and doxycycline in the treatment of early Lyme disease. Ann Intern Med1992; 117:273-80Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Primohamed M, James S, Meakin S, et al. Adverse drug reactions as cause of admission to hospital: prospective analysis of 18,820 patients. BMJ 2004; 329: 15–9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kongkaew C, Noyce PR, Ashcroft DM. Hospital admissions associated with adverse drug reactions: a systematic review of prospective observational studies. Ann Pharmacol 2008; 42: 1017–25CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Burrowes JD, Van Houten G. Use of alternative medicine by patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease. Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 2005; 12(3): 312–25PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Naranjo CA, Buasto U, Sellers P, et al. A method for estimating the probability of adverse drug reactions. Clin Pharmacol Ther 1981; 30(2): 239–45PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    AlBraik FA, Rutter PM, Brown D. A cross-sectional survey of herbal remedy taking by United Arab Emirate (UAE) citizens in Abu Dhabi. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Safety 2008; 17: 725–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Poudel A, Palaian S, Shankar PR, et al. Irrational fixed dose combinations in Nepal: Need for intervention Kathmandu Univ Med J 2008; 6: 53–1Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Mishra P, Alurkar VM, Subish P. Functions of a drug and therapeutics committee in Nepal. J Pharm Pract Res 2006; 31: 81Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Das B. Prescribing trend of fixed-dose drug combinations in a tertiary hospital in Nepal. J Inst Med 2000; 22: 212–8Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Kafle KK. Karkee SB. Re-evaluation of registered drugs with the purpose of deregistering irrational medicines. Department of Drug Administration (DDA) a report submitted by Pharmaceutical Horizon of Nepal (PHON), Kathmandu (2007)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    UN Consolidated List of Products Whose Consumption and/or Sale Have been Banned, Withdrawn, Severely Restricted or Not Approved by Governments (Eighth Issue, Pharmaceuticals, 2003)Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lawler CP, Prioleau C, Lewis MM, et al. Interactions of the novel antipsychotic aripiprazole (OPC-14597) with serotonin and dopamine receptor subtypes. Neuropsychopharmacology 1999; 20(6): 612–27PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Findling RL, Kauffman RE, Sallee FR, et al. Tolerability and pharmacokinetics of aripiprazole in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders: an open-label, dose-escalation study. J Clin Psychopharmacology 2008 Aug; 28(4): 441–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Ingate S, Tranter D, Banerjee A, et al. An Industry perspective on the Erice Declaration and Risk Management Plans. Drug safety 2006; 29(8): 733–4PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    MHRA. Risk management plans (RMPs). Mail: The MHRA updating service for medicines 2006; 155: 3–4Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Etude EMIR sur les hospitalisations liées à un effet indésirable médicamenteux. Commission nationale de pharmacovigilance du 25 mars 2008. http://www.afssaps.fr/var/afssaps_site/storage/original/application/bd7be64de27e31df5c8182983443353f.pdf
  2. 2.
    Hallas J, Haghfelt T, Gram LF, et al. Drug related admissions to a cardiology department; frequency and avoidability. J Intern Med 1990; 228: 379–84PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Queneau P, Trombert B, Carpentier F, et al. Adverse drug effects: a prospective study by Apnet performed in seven emergency care units in France: propositions for preventive measures. Ann Pharm Fr 2005; 63: 131–42PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Current Challenges in Pharmacovigilance: Pragmatic Approach -Report of CIOMS Working Group V — Geneva 2001Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Fernandopulle RBM, Weerasuriya K. What Can Consumer Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Add to Existing Health Professional-Based Systems? Focus on the Developing World. Drug Safety 2003; 26(4): 219–25PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Volume 5, Chapter I, Subchapter D, Part 314, Sec. 314.80 “postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences” Revised as of April 1, 2007Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    MedWatch: Managing Risks at the FDA-Norman Marks, M.D., director of the FDA’s MedWatch program-A Special Report from FDA Consumer MagazineGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Problems with FDA Oversight-Consumer Report-Consumer Reports: Drug Approval, Follow-Up ‘Flawed’-Daniel DeNoon, Brunilda Nazario, MD-December 05, 2005Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    New Consumer Reports Poll Finds Most Americans Don’t Know They Can Report Bad Reactions to FDA Safety Program — ConsumerUnion.orgGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
    Bringing the Consumer Revolution to the FDA-April 25, 2005-Alexander TabarrokGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Fønnebø V, Verhoef M, Paterson C. Cancer and complementary medice: an international perspective. Support Care Cancer 2007; 15: 999–1002PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cassileth B. Complementary and alternative cancer medicine. Journal of Clnical Oncology 1999;17(11): 44–52Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Öhman I, Vitols S, Luef G, et al. Topiramate kinetics during delivery, lactation, and in the neonate: Preliminary observations. Epilepsia 2002; 43(10): 1157–60PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Öhman I, Leuf G, Tomson T. Topiramate kinetics during lactation. Epilepsia 2007; 48 Suppl. 7: 156–7Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fröscher W, Jürges U. Topiramateinnahme wäahrend des Stillens. Aktuelle Neurologie 2006; 33: 215–7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gentile S. Topiramate in pregnancy and breastfeeding. Clin Drug Invest 2009; 29(2): 139–41CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Frossard JL, Steer ML, Pastor CM. Acute pancreatitis. Lancet 2008; 371:143–52PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Balani AR, Grendell JH. Drug-induced pancreatitis: incidence, management and prevention. Drug Saf 2008; 31: 823–37PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Langers AM, Jonkers GJ. Pancreatitis ascribed to the use of itraconazole. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2001; 145: 1127–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Badalov N, Baradarian R, Iswara K, et al. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis: an evidence-based review. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2007; 5: 648–61PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Dhir R, Brown DK, Olden KW. Drug-induced pancreatitis: a practical review. Drugs Today (Barc.) 2007; 43: 499–507CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    ICH E2C. Note for guidance on clinical safety data management: Periodic Safety Update Reports for Marketed Drugs, CPMP/ICH/ 288/95; 1997Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    CIOMS Working Group VI. Management of Safety Information from Clinical Trials; 2005Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    ICH E2F. Note for guidance on Development Safety Update Report, EMEA/CHMP/ICH/309 348/2008Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Carson KR, Evens AM, Richey EA, et al. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy after rituximab therapy in HIV negative patients: a report of 57 cases from the Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports project. Blood 2009 14; 113: 4834–40CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Doty RL, Bromley SM. Effects of drugs on olfaction and taste. Otolaryngol Clin North Am 2004; 37: 1229–54PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Stang P. Epidemiological Context of Signalling. Drug Saf 2007; 30(7): 611–3PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Moore N, Hall G, Sturkenboom M, et al. Biases affecting the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) in spontaneous reports pharmacovigilance databases: the example of sertindole. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2003; 12: 271–81PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pariente A, Gregoire F, Fourrier-Reglat A, et al. Impact of Safety Alerts on Measures of Disproportionality in Spontaneous Reporting Databases. The Notoriety Bias. Drug Saf 2007; 30(10): 891–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
  2. 2.
    Quality management systems. Requirements ISO 9001:2000. Comite Européen de Normalisation, 2000Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Norwegian Medicines Agency. Legemiddelverket advarer mot kosttils-kuddet Fortodol: Ny rapport viser at 7 av 9 varepartier inneholder ulovlig tilsatt legemiddel (nimesulid) [document on the Internet]. Oslo: 2009 [2009 May 12; cited 2009 Jun 11]. Available from: http://www.legemiddelverket.no
  2. 2.
    EMEA (European Medicines Agency). Press Release: European Medicines Agency recommends restricted use of nimesulid-containing medicinal products [document on the Internet]. London: 2007 [2007 Sept 21; cited 2009 Jun 11]. Available from: http://www.emea.europa.eu
  3. 3.
    Venhuis BJ, Zwaagstra ME, van den Berg JDJ, Wagenaar HWG, van Riel AJHP, Barends DM et al. Trends in drug substances detected in illegal weight-loss medicines and dietarty supplements. A 2002–2007 survey and health risk analysis. National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands, 2009Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Almond DS, Rhodes LE, Pirmohamed M. Risperidone-induced photosensitivity. Postgrad Med J 1998; 74: 252–3 ReferencesPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 1.
    Lee WM. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity. N Engl J Med 2003; 349: 474–85PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 2.
    Abboud G, Kaplowitz N. Drug-induced liver injury. Drug Safety 2007; 30: 277–94PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Cicardi M, Zingale LC, Bergamaschini L, et al. Angioedema associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use: outcome after switching to a different treatment. Arch Intern Med 2004; 164: 910–3PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Howes LG, Tran D. Can angiotensin receptor antagonists be used safely in patients with previous ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema? Drug Safety 2002; 25(2): 73–1Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Aronson JK, Ferner RE. Joining the DoTS: new approach to classifying adverse drug reactions. BMJ 2003; 327:1222–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    WHO. (2008) About the ATC/DDD system. WHO Collaborating Centre for Drug Statistics Methodology [online]. Available from: http://www.whocc.no/atcddd/ [Accessed 14 Jan 2009]

References

  1. 1.
    Dutch SmPCs Strattera® and Ritalin®, wwwcbg-meb nl 2009 April 29
  2. 2.
    Sivrioglu EY, Topaloglu VC, Sarandol A, et al. Reboxetine induced erectile dysfunction and spontaneous ejaculation during defecation and micturition. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2007 Mar 30; 31(2): 548–50PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Yoshida K, Higuchi H, Takahashi H, et al. Ejaculation after defecation without orgasm induced by milnacipran. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 2004; 16(4): 544PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wang PW, Wang SY, Huang CJ. Zotepine-induced spontaneous ejaculation. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther 2008 Nov; 46(11): 571–3PubMedGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Pearson RK, Hauben M, Goldsmith DI, et al. Influence of the MedDRA((R)) hierarchy on pharmacovigilance data mining results. Int J Med Inform, 2009 Feb 18Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Varenicline: safety update. Drug Safety Update 2008; 1:3–4Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Aronson JK, Ferner RE. Joining the DoTS: new approach to classifying adverse drug reactions. BMJ 2003; 327:1222–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Report of CIOMS Working Group V. Current Challenges in Pharmacovigilance: Pragmatic Approaches. Geneva: CIOMS, 2001Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    LeLorier J, Duh MS, Paradis PE, et al. Econonomic impact of generic substitution of lamotrigine: projected costs in the US using findings in a Canadian setting. Curr Med Res Opin 2008; 24: 1069–81PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Coluchi N, Munford V, Manzur J, et al. Detection, subgroup specificity, and genotype diversity of rotavirus strains in children with acute diarrhea in paraguay. J Clin Microbiol 2002; 40: 1709–14PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Higuchi N, Tahara N, et al. NAT2*6A, a haplotype of the N -acetyltransferase 2 gene, is an important biomarker for risk of anti-tuberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Japanese patients with tuberculosis. World J Gastroenterol 2007 December 7; 13(45): 6003–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lear JT, Atherton MT, Byrne JPH. Neutrophilic dermatoses: pyoderma gangrenosum and Sweet’s syndrome. Postgrad Med J 1997; 73:65–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Miall F, Harman K, Kennedy B, et al. Pyoderma gangrenosum complicating pegylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in Hodgkin lymphoma. British Journal oh Haematology 2005; 132: 114–7Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Roujeau JC. Neutrophilic drug eruptions. Clin Dermatol 2000; 18(3): 331–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Luzzi GA, Peto TE. Adverse effects of antimalarials. An update. Drug Saf 1993; 8(4): 295–311PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Barrett PJ, Emmins PD, Clarke PD, et al. Comparison of adverse events associated with use of mefloquine and combination of chloroquine and proguanil as antimalarial prophylaxis: postal and telephone survey of travellers. BMJ 1996; 313(7056): 525–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Høgh B, Clarke PD, Camus D, et al. Atovaquone-proguanil versus chloroquine-proguanil for malaria prophylaxis in non-immune travellers: a randomised, double-blind study. Malarone International Study Team. Lancet 2000 Dec 2; 356(9245): 1888–94PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wielgo-Polanin R, Lagarce L, Gautron E, et al. Hepatotoxicity associated with the use of a fixed combination of chloroquine and proguanil. Int J Antimicrob Agents 2005; 26(2): 176–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Auer J, Hinterreiter M, Allinger S, et al. Severe pancytopenia after leflunomide in rheumatoid arthritis. Acta Med Austriaca 2000; 27(4): 131–2PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Chan J, Sanders DC, Du L, et al. Leflunomide-associated pancytopenia with or without methotrexate. Ann Pharmacother 2004; 38(7–8): 1206–11PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Marchesoni A, Arreghini M, Panni B, et al. Life-threatening reversible bone marrow toxicity in a rheumatoid arthritis patient switched from leflunomide to infliximab. Rheumatology (Oxford) 2003; 42(1): 193–4CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    McEwen J, Purcell PM, Hill RL, et al. The incidence of pancytopenia in patients taking leflunomide alone or with methotrexate. Pharmaco-epidemiol Drug Saf 2007; 16(1): 65–73CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Bongard V, Ménard-Tache S, Bagherri H et al. Perception of the risk of adverse drug reactions: differences between health professionals and non health professionals. Br Clin Pharmacol 2002; 54: 433–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Sahin G, Korkmaz C, Yalcin AU. Which statin should be used together with colchicine? Clinical experience in three patients with nephrotic syndrome due to AA type amyloidosis. Rheumatol Int 2008; 28(3): 289–91PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kuncl RW, Duncan G, Watson D, et al. Colchicine myopathy and neuropathy. N Engl J Med 1987; 316: 1562–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Halpern SM, Volans GN. Cutaneous toxicity of ibuprofen. Arch Dermatol 1994; 130(2): 259–60PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Peters F, Maessen-Visch B, Kho L. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis induced by a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. J Rheumatol 1996; 23(11): 2008–9PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Davidson KA, Ringpfeil F, Lee JB. Ibuprofen-induced bullous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Cutis 2001; 67(4): 303–7PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Ramsay LE, Williams B, Johnston GD, et al. Guidelines for management of hypertension: report of the third working party of the British Hypertension Society. J Human Hypertens 1999; 13: 569–92CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Smellie WS, Forth J, Coleman JJ, et al. Best practice in primary care pathology: review 6. J Clin Pathol 2007; 60: 225–34PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Prybys KM. Deadly drug interactions in emergency medicine. Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America 2004; 22: 845–63PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Baxter K. Stockley’s Drug Interactions A Source Book of Interactions, Their Mechanisms, Clinical Importance and Management. Pharmaceutical Press. 8th ed. 2007Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    White TJ, Arakelian A, Rho JP. Counting the costs of drug-related adverse events. Pharmacoeconomics 1999; 15: 445–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hepler CD, Strand LM. Opportunities and responsibilities in pharmaceutical care. Am J Hosp Pharm 1990; 47: 533–43PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Inpra K, Suwankesawong W, et al. Incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions in 21 selected Thai hospital project. Presented at 26th WHO Annual meeting of the representatives of National Centres. December 7–10, 2003. New delhi. IndiaGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Garcia-Lora E, Tercedor J, Massare E, et al. Interferon induced psoriasis in a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Dermatology 1993; 187: 280PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Volume 9A of the Rules Governing Medicinal products in the European Union-Guidelines on Pharmacovigilance for Medicinal Products for Human Use. (http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/pharmaceuticals/eudralex/vol-9/pdf/vol9a_09-2008.pdf)

References

  1. 1.
    Servier Laboratories Limited. Ivabradine Summary of Product Characteristics. 2006Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Shakir SAW. Prescription-Event Monitoring. In: Strom BL, editor. Pharmacoepidemiology. 4th ed. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2005: 203–16Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Tohyama M, Hashimoto K, Yasukawa M, et al. Association of human herpesvirus 6 reactivation with the flaring and severity of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Br J Dermatol 2007; 157: 934–40PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kardaun SH, et al. Variability in the clinical pattern of cutaneous side effects of drugs with systemic symptoms: does a DRESS syndrome really exist? Br J Dermatol 2007; 156: 609–11Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Roujeau JC, Kelly JP, Naldi L, et al. Medication use and the risk of Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. N Engl J Med 1995; 333: 1600–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Letko E, Papaliodis DN, Papaliodia GN, et al. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: a review of the literature. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2005; 94: 419–36PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Applied pharmacotherapeutics. P38–15Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Yamane Y, Aihara M, Ikezawa Z. Analysis of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Japan from 2000 to 2006. AllergoInt 2007; 6: 419–25Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Mukasa Y, Craven N. Management of toxic epidermal necrolysis and related syndromes. Postgrad Med J 2008; 84: 60–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Taiwan Drug Relief database in TaiwanGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    FDA Working Group. CDER-PhRMA-AASLD Conference 2000: clinical white paper on drug-induced hepatotoxicity, November 2000. [online]. Available at http://www.fda.gov/cder/livertox/clinical.pdf [Accessed January 20, 2006]
  2. 2.
    Johns MB, Paulus-Thomas JE. Purification of human genomic DNA from whole blood using sodium perchlorate in place of phenol. Annals of Biochemistry 1989; 180: 276–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bakshi S, Ramachandran G, RAmesh K et al. Study of ABCB1 polymorphism (C3435T) in HIV-1 infected individuals from South India. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2008; 65(5): 791–2PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lalvani P, et al. Assessment of adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting in Botswana, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Zambia, Zimbabwe. September 200Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Martindale: The Complete Drug Reference & Physician’s Desk Reference, 2008Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Roujeau J-C, Kelly JP, Naldi L, et al. Medication use and the risk of Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. New Eng J Med 1995 Dec 14; 333: 1600–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Vanfleteren I, van Gysel D, de Brandt C. Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a diagnostic challenge in the absence of skin lesions. Pediatric Dermat 2003; 20: 52–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Molecular Operating Environment (MOE), Version 2006.08, Chemical Computing Group, Inc..Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    World Health Organisation. Pertusis vaccine-WHO position paper. Wkly Epidemiol Rec 2005; 80: 31–9Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kanra G, Kara A, Demiralp O, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of a new fully liquid DTPw-HepB-Hib combination vaccine in infants. Hum Vaccin. 2006 Jul–Aug; 2(4): 155–60. Epub 2006 Jul 21PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Shah R, Raghu MB, Shivananda A, et al. Immunogenicity and safety of an indigenously developed DTPw hepatitis B combination vaccine in Indian infants. Indian Pediatr 2008 Oct; 45(10): 819–23PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Riedemann S, Reinhardt G, Jara J, et al. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of combined versus separately administered DTPw-HBV and Hib vaccines given to healthy infants at 2, 4 and 6 months of age, with a booster at 18 months. Int J Infect Dis 2002 Sep; 6(3): 215–22PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Botet Asensi FI, Veronese A, Del Carmen Otero M, et al. Immunogenicity and safety in infants of a DTwPHib full liquid vaccine. Acta Paediatr 2003 May; 92(5): 541–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Limsuwan T, Tragulpiankit P, Chulavatnatol S, et al. Prevalence and characteristics of adverse drug events in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis ambulatory patients at a large teaching hospital, Thailand [abstract]. EJD 2008; 18: 262–3Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kaboli PJ, Hoth AB, McClimon BJ, et al. Clinical pharmacists and inpatient medical care. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166: 955–64PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Norés JM, Biacabe B, Bonfils P. Troubles olfactifs d’origine médicamenteuse: analyse et revue de la littérature. Rev Med Interne 2000; 21(11): 972–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ratrema M, Guy C, Nelva A, et al., Association Française des Centres Régionaux de Pharmacovigilance. Troubles du goût d’origine médicamen-teuse: analyse de la Banque Nationale de Pharmacovigilance et revue de la littérature. Therapie 2001; 56(1): 41–50PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Cabrini S, Baratti M, Bonfa F, et al. Preliminari evaluation of DDS-PC inventory: a new tool to assess impulsive-compulsive behaviours associated to dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson’s disease. Neurol Sci 2009; as supplied by publisherGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dagher A, RobbinsTW. Neuron 2009; 61: 502–1Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    O’Sullivan SS, Evans AH, Lees AJ. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome: an overview of its epidemiology, mechanisms and management. CNS Drugs 2009; 23: 157–70PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Antononi A, Cilia R. Behavioural adverse effects of dopaminergic treatments in Parkinson’s disease: incidence, neurobiological basis, management and prevention. Drug Saf 2009; 32: 475–88CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Issues in Emerging Health Technologies-Pharmacogenomics and warfarin therapy. October 2007; Issue 104Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bacquemont L. Evidence for a pharmacogenetic adapted dose of oral anticoagulant in routine medical practice. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2008 Oct; 64(10): 953–60CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kim MJ, Huang SM, Meyer UA, et al. A regulatory science perspective on warfarin therapy: a pharmacogenetic opportunity. J Clin Pharmacol 2009; 49: 138–46PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Shakir SAW. Prescription-Event Monitoring. In: Strom BL, editor. Pharmacoepidemiology. 4th ed. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2005: 203–16Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Sabaté E. Adherence to long-term therapies: evidence for action [e-book]. Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2003 [cited 2009 May 14]. Available from: http://www.who.int/chp/knowledge/publications/adherence_report/en/index.html
  2. 2.
    Jokisalo E, Kumpusalo E, Enlund H, et al. Factors related to non-compliance with antihypertensive drug therapy. J Hum Hypertens 2002; 16: 577–83PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ambrosioni E, Leonetti G, Pessina AC, et al. Patterns of hypertension management in Italy: results of a pharmacoepidemiological survey on antihypertensive therapy. Scientific Committee of the Italian Pharmacoepidemiological Survey on Antihypertensive Therapy. J Hypertens 2000; 18(11): 1691–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Jacobson TA. Toward “Pain-Free” Statin Prescribing: Clinical Algorithm for Diagnosis and Management of Myalgia. Mayo Clin Proc 2008; 83: 687–700PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Pullatt RC, Gadarla MR, Karas RH, et al. Tendon Rupture Associated With Simvastatin/Ezetimibe Therapy. Am J Cardiol 2007; 100: 152–3PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Marie I, Delafenetre H, Massy N, et al. Tendinous Disorders Attributed to Statins: A Study on Ninety-Six Spontaneous Reports in the Period 1990–2005 and Review of the Literature. Arthritis & Rheumatism (Arthritis Care & Research) 2008; 59: 367–72CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    UK SPC, at the electronic Medicines Compendium. URL: http://emc.medicines.org.uk/ Accessed 5 March 2009
  5. 5.
    Micromedex healthcare series; Physician’s Desk Reference. URL: http://www.thomsonhc.com/ Accessed 5 March 2009

References

  1. 1.
    The electronic Medicines Compendium. Datapharm Communications Ltd. [online]. Available from URL: http://www.medicines.org.uk/ [Accessed 2009 April]
  2. 2.
    Martindale. Thompson Micromedex database [online]. Available from URL: http://www.thomsonhc.com [Accessed 2009 April]
  3. 3.
    Physician’s Desk Reference. Thompson Micromedex database [online]. Available from URL: http://www.thomsonhc.com [Accessed 2009 April]

References

  1. 1.
    Kando JC, Yonkers KA, Cole JO. Gender as a risk factor for adverse events to medications. Drugs 1995; 50(1): 1–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Anderson GD. Gender differences in pharmacological response. Int Rev Neurobiol 2008; 83: 1–10PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Rademarker M. Do women have more adverse drug reactions? Am J Clin Dermatol 2001; 2(6): 349–51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Domecq C, Naranjo CA, Ruiz I, et al. Sex-related variations in the frequency and characteristics of adverse drug reactions. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 1980; 18(8): 362–6PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Tran C, Knowles SR, Liu BA, et al. Gender differences in adverse drug reactions. J Clin Pharmacol 1998; 38(11): 1003–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Lindquist M. Vigibase, the WHO Global ICSR Database System: Basic Facts. Drug Information Journal 2008; 42(5): 409–19Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lindquist M. Vigibase, the WHO Global ICSR Database System: Basic Facts. Drug Inf J 2008; 42(5): 409–19Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    European Medicines Agency. ICH Topic E 11 Clinical Investigation of Medicinal Products in the Paediatric Population. January 2001 CPMP/ ICH/2711/99 [online]. Available from URL: http://www.emea.europa.eu/pdfs/human/paediatrics/19481005en.pdf: [Accessed 2009 June 10]
  3. 3.
    Johann-Liang R, Wyeth J, Chen M, et al. Pediatric drug surveillance and the Food and Drug Administration’s adverse event reporting system: an overview of reports, 2003–2007. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2009; 18(1): 24–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Norén GN, Bate A, Hopstadius J, et al. Temporal pattern discovery for trends and transient effects: its application to patient records. Proceeding of the 14th ACM SIGKDD international conference on Knowledge discovery and data mining 2008: 963–971; http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1401890.1402005
  2. 2.
    Knol W, van Marum RJ, Jansen PA, et al. Antipsychotic drug use and risk of pneumonia in elderly people. J Am Geriatr Soc 2008; 56(4): 661–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Feldman HA, Goldstein I, Hatzichristou DG, et al. Impotence and its medical and psychosocial correlates: results of the Massachusetts Male Aging Study. J Urol 1994; 151: 54–61PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Mukherjee B, Shivakumar T. A case of sensorineural deafness following ingestion of sildenafil. J Laryngol Otol 2007; 121: 395–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Almanza A, Navarrete F, Vega R, et al. Modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ current in vestibular hair cells by nitric oxide. J Neurophysiol 2007; 97: 1188–95PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Boyer EW, Shannon M. The Serotonin Syndrome. N Engl J Med 2005; 352: 1112–20PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Chantix (varenicline) product information [online]. New York: Pfizer 2008. Available from: URL:http://www.pfizer.com [Accessed 2009 Feb 02]Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    The electronic Medicines Compendium (eMC) [online]. Available from: URL:http://emc.medicines.org.uk/ [Accessed 2009 Feb 02]Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Martindale. Thompson Micromedex database [online]. Available from URL: http://www.thomsonhc.com [Accessed 2009 April].

References

  1. 1.
    Roujeau Jc, Stern RS. Severe adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs. N Engl J Med 1994; 331(19): 1272–85PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Svensson C, Cowen E, Gaspari A. Cutaneous Drug reactions. Pharmacological Rewies 2000; 53: 357–79Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Revuz J, Valeyrie-Allanore L, Reacciones medicamentosas. In: Bolognia J, Jorizzo J, Rapini R, editors. Dermatología. Elsevier, 2003: 333–54Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Coopman S, Johnson R, Platt R y cols. Cuatneous Disease and Drug Reactions in HIV infection. N Engl J Med 1993; 328: 1670–3PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bass SP, Colebatch HJH. Fluoxetine-induced lung damage. Med J Aust 1992; 156: 364–5PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gonzalez-Rothi RJ, Zander DS, Ros PR. Fluoxetine hydrochloride (Prozac)-induced pulmonary disease. Chest 1995; 107: 1763–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    de Kerviler E, Trédaniel J, Revlon G, et al. Fluoxetin-induced pulmonary granulomatosis. Eur Respir J 1996; 9: 615–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Vandezande LM, Lamblin C, Wallaert B. Interstitial lung disease linked to fluoxetine. Rev Mal Respir 1997; 14: 327–9PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Braun D, Nippert B, Loeuille D, et al. Interstitial pneumopathy induced by fluoxetine. Rev Med Interne 1999; 20: 949–50PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Hamrock D. Adverse events associated with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Int Immunopharmacol 2006; 6(4): 535–42PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Orbach H, Katz U, Sherer Y, et al. Intravenous immunoglobulin: Adverse effects and safe administration. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 2005; 38(2): 123–37Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Itkin YM, Trujillo TC. Intravenous immunoglobulin-associated acute renal failure: case series and literature review. Pharmacotherapy 2005; 25(6): 886–92PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Dalakas MC, Clark WMC. Strokes, thromboembolic events, and IVIg. Rare incidents blemish an excellent safety record. Neurology 2003; 60:1736–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    De Riu PL, et al. Epileptic seizures after treatment with thiocolchicoside. Epilepsia 2001;42: 1084–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilitédes effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hoppman A, Peden JG, Ober SK. Central Nervous system side effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Arch Intern Med 1991; 151: 1309–13CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sanchez-valiente S. Encefalopatia mioclonica originada por el tratamien-to con Diclofenac. Rev Neurol 1995; 23: 1226–7PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sanchez-Hernandez MC, Delgado J, Navarro AM, et al. Seizures induced by NSAID. Allergy 1999; 54: 78–92CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Download reporting forms and promotional material for the Yellow Card Scheme. http://www.mhra.gov.uk/Safetyinformation/Reportingsafetyproblems/Medicines/Reportingsuspectedadversedrugreactions/Downloadreportingformsandpromotionalmaterial/index.htm (Accessed 1 1th June 2009)
  2. 2.
    House of Commons Health Committee. The influence of the pharmaceutical industry. Fourth report of session 2004–5Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hammond IW, Rich D. Consumers usurp spontaneous adverse event reporting in the United States. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2005; 14: S8–9Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Tehrani R, Ostrowski RA, Hariman R, et al. Ocular toxicity of hydroxychloroquine. Semin Ophthalmol 2008; 23: 201–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilitédes effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments: actualisation de la méthode utilisée en France. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ingster-Moati I, Bui Quoc E, Crochet M, et al. Severe chloroquine- and hydroxychloroquine-induced retinopathy. 2006; 29: 642–Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Tripp JM, Maibach HI. Hydroxychloroquine-induced retinopathy: a dermatologic perspective. Am J Clin Dermatol 2006; 7: 171–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lew BL, Haw CR, Lee MH. Cutaneous drug eruption from cetirizine and hydroxyzine. Am Acad Dermatol 2004; 50: 953–6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, Lagier G. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments: actualisation de la méthode utilisée en France. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Epstein E. Dermatitis due to antihistaminic agents. J Invest Dermatol 1994; 12: 1512Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Gurvinder P, Thami MD. Fixed drug eruption caused by itraconazole: Reactivity and cross reactivity. J AM Acad dermatol 2008Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ghislain PD, Ghislain E. Fixed drug eruption due to fluconazole: a third case. J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46: 467PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Khandpur S, Reddy BS. Fixed drug eruptions to two chemically unrelated antifungal agents. Indian J Dermatol 2000; 45: 174–6Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Arika Bansal, Rashmi Kumari, M Ramam. Fixed drug eruption due to cross reaction between two azoles used for different indications. Indian J Dermatol 2008; 74: 81–81Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Esplugas E, Cequier A, et al. Comparative Tolerability of Contrast Media Used for Coronary Interventions. Drug Safety 2002; 25: 1079–98PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Brown SG. Clinical features and severity grading of anaphylaxis. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2004; 114: 371–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lieberman PL, Seigle RL. Reactions to radiocontrast material: anaphy-lactoid events in radiology. Clin Rev Allergy Immunol 1999; 17: 469–96PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Katayama H, Yamaguchi K, Kozuka T, et al. Adverse reactions to ionic and nonionic contrast media: a report from the Japanese Committee on the Safety of Contrast Media. Radiology 1990; 175: 621–8PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Dogan G. Possible isotretinoin-induced keloids in a patient with Behcet’s disease. Clin Exp Dermatol 2006; 31(4): 535PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ginarte M, Peteiro C, Toribio J. Keloid formation induced by isotretinoin therapy. Int J Dermatol 1999 Mar; 38(3): 228–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ruef C, Blaser J. Miscellaneous antibacterial drugs: aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides. In: Dukes MNG, Aronson JK, editors. Meyler’s side effects of drugs. 14th ed. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2004Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Nikkels AF, Nikkels-Tassoudji N, Pierard GE. Cutaneous adverse reactions following anti-infective vaccinations. Am J Clin Dermatol 2005; 6: 79–87PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tapiainen T, Cherry JD, Heininger U. Effect of injection site on reactogenicity and immunogenicity of acellular and whole-cell pertussis component diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccines in infants. Vaccine 2005; 23: 5106–12PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Cassidy WM, Jones G, Williams K, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of concomitant versus non concomitant administration of hepatitis B, tetanus-diphtheria, and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines in healthy eleven- to twelve-year-olds. Journal of Adolescent Health 2005; 36: 187–92PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Woodhouse J, Martin EV. Eruptive nevi of the palms and soles. J Am Acad Dermatol 2000; 52(5 Suppl. 1): S96–100CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gurguta C, Kauer C, Bergholz U, et al. Tongue and skin Hyperpigmentation during PEG-Interferon-α/Ribaverin Therapy in dark skinned non Caucasian patients with Chronic Hepatitis C. Am J Gastroenterol 2006; 101: 197–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Richert S, Bloom EJ, Flynn K, et al. Widespread eruptive dermal and atypical melanocytic nevi in association with chronic leukaemia: case reportand review of the literature. J Am Acad Dermatol 1996; 35: 326–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    D’Souza RM, Campbell-Lloyd S, Isaacs D. Adverse Events Following Immunisation associated with the 1998 Australian Measles Control Campaign. Commun Dis Intell 2000; 24: 27–33PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Nolan T, McIntyre P, Roberton D. Reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a live attenuated tetravalent measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine. Vaccine 2002; 21: 281–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111PubMedGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Mahboob A, Haroon TS. Drugs causing fixed drug eruptions: a study of 450 cases. International journal of dermatology 2008; 37: 833–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Esplugas E, Cequier A, et al. Comparative tolerability of contrast media used for coronary interventions. Drug Safety 2002; 25: 1079–98PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cassidy WM, Jones G, Williams K, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of concomitant versus nonconcomitant administration of hepatitis B, tetanus-diphtheria, and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines in healthy eleven- to twelve-year-olds. Journal of Adolescent Health 2005; 36: 187–92PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Nikkels AF, Nikkels-Tassoudji N, Pierard GE. Cutaneous adverse reactions following anti-infective vaccinations. Am J Clin Dermatol 2005; 6: 79–87PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Goddard J, Turner AN, Cumming AD, et al. Kidney and urinary tract disease. In: Boon NA, Colledge NR, Walker BR, Hunter JAA, editors. Davidon’s Principle and Practice of medicine. 20th ed. International Edition. New York: Churchil Livingstone, 2006: 467–82Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Chowdhary SK, Kolar M, Yeung CK. Urinary tract infection: The urological perspective. Indian J Pediatr 2004; 71: 111 7–20CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Which antibiotics are apprariate for treating bacteriuria in pregnancy. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2000; 46Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Meinert CL, Knatterud GL, Prout TE, et al. A study of the effects of hypoglycemic agents on vascular complications in patients with adult-onset diabetes. II. Mortality results. Diabetes 1970; 19: Suppl.: 789–830PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Riveline JP, Danchin N, Ledru F, et al. Sulfonylureas and cardiovascular effects: from experimental data to clinical use. Available data in humans and clinical applications. Diabetes Metab 2003; 29: 207–22PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Daubrey-P Th, Die-Kacou H, Kamagate M, et al. Fièvre bilieuse hémoglobinurique au cours du traitement antipaludique à Abidjan: à propos de 41 cas. Bull Soc Path Exot 2004; 97: 325–8Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lasser KE, Allen PD, Woolhandler SJ, et al. Timing of new black box warnings and withdrawals for prescription medications. JAMA 2002; 287: 2215–20PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Le J, Nguyen T, Law Av, et al. Adverse Drug Reactions Among Children Over a 10-Year Period. Pediatrics 2006; 118: 555–62PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    United Nations Environment Programme. The 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (as agreed in 1987). [Internet monograph] Ozone Secrétariat; 1987. Available at: http://ozone.unep.org/spanish/Ratification_status/montreal_protocol.shtml [Accessed June 2007]
  2. 2.
    AstraZeneca Farmacéutica Spain, S.A. Pulmicort® 100 y 200mg/inh suspensión para inhalación en envase a presión. summary of product characteristics. March 2008Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Plaza V, Álvarez FJ, Casan P, et al. GEMA Executive Committee. Spanish Guide for Asthma Management [Guía Española para el Manejo del Asma -GEMA]. Arch Bronconeumol 2003; 39 Suppl 5: 1–42Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Juniper EF, O’Byrne PM, Guyatt GH, et al. Development and validation of a questionnaire to measure asthma control. Eur Respir J 1999 Oct; 14(4): 902–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Braun MM, Terracciano G, Salive ME, et al. Report of a US Public Health Service Workshop on Hypotonic-Hyporesponsive episodes (HHE) after pertusis immunization. Pediatrics 1998; 102Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tracy S, Duvernoy M, Miles Braun, and the VAERS Working Group. Hypotonic-Hyporesponsive episodes reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), 1996–1998. Pediatrics 2000; 106Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Healy D, Herxheimer A, Menkes D. Antidepressants and violence: problems at the interface of medicine and law. PLoS Medicine 2006; 3(9): e372PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Weinberg GL, Di Gregorio G, Ripper R, et al. Resuscitation with lipid versus epinephrine in a rat model of bupivacaine overdose. Anesthesiology 2008; 108(5): 907–13PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kawano T, Oshita S, Takahashi A, et al. Molecular mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of bupivacaine, levobupivacaine, and ropivacaine on sarcolemmal adenosine triposphate-sensitive potassium chjannels in the cardiovascular system. Anesthsiology 2004; 101(2): 390–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Evans SJW, Waller PC, Davis S. Use of proportional reporting ratios (PRRs) for signal generation from spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2001; 10(6): 483–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Szarfman A, Machado SG, O’Neill RT. Use of screening algorithms and computer systems to efficiently signal higher-than-expected combinations of drugs and events in the US FDA’s spontaneous reports database. Drug Saf 2002; 25(6): 381–92PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bate A, Lindquist M, Edwards IR, et al. A Bayesian neural network method for adverse drug reaction signal generation. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 1998; 54(4): 315–21PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    van Puijenbroek E, Diemont W, van Grootheest K. Application of quantitative signal detection in the Dutch spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions. Drug Saf 2003; 26(5): 293–301PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Faculty of Pharmaceutical science Chulalongkorn University. Development of signal detection and assessment tool for the Thai FDA spontaneous reporting database. Bangkok 2005Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Ohman I, Vitols S, Tomson T. Lamotrigine in pregnancy: pharmacokinetics during delivery, in the neonate, and during lactation. Epilepsia 2000; 41: 709–13PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Rambeck B, Kurlemann G, Stodieck SRG, et al. Concentrations of lamotrigine in a mother on lamotrigine treatment and her newborn child. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 1997; 51: 481–4PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Newport DJ, Pennell PB, Calamaras MR, et al. Lamotrigine in breast milk and nursing infants: determination of exposure. Pediatrics 2008; 122: e223–31. Epub30Jun2008PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Fotopoulou C, Kretz R, Bauer S, et al. Prospectively assessed changes in lamotrigine-concentration in women with epilepsy during pregnancy, lactation and the neonatal period. Epilepsy Res. Epub 2009 Mar 7Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pennell PB, Newport DJ, Stowe ZN, et al. The impact of pregnancy and childbirth on the metabolism of lamotrigine. Neurology 2004; 62: 292–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Blenkinsopp A, et al. Patient reporting of suspected adverse drug reactions: a review of published literature and international experience. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2006; 63: 148–56CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    www.mhra.gov.uk/mhra/drugsafetyupdate. Patient reporting 2009; 2(10): 5Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Siskind MS, Thienemann D, Kirlin L. Isoniazid-induced neurotoxicity in chronic dialysis patients: report of three cases and a review of the literature. Nephron 1993; 64: 303–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Steichen O, Martinez-Almoyna L, De Broucker T. Isoniazid induced neuropathy: consider prevention. Rev Mal Respir 2006; 23: 157–60PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    McCarthy KL, Playford EG, Looke DF, et al. Severe photosensitivity causing multifocal squamous cell carcinomas secondary to prolonged voriconazole therapy. Clin Infect Dis 2007 Mar 1; 44(5): e55–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Vanacker A, Fabré G, Van Dorpe J, et al. Aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma associated with prolonged voriconazole therapy in a renal transplant patient. Am J Transplant 2008 Apr; 8(4): 877–80PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Brunel AS, Fraisse T, Lechiche C, et al. Multifocal squamous cell carcinomas in an HIV-infected patient with a long-term voriconazole therapy. AIDS 2008 Apr 23; 22(7): 905–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Feist AA, Osborne SL, Thistletwhaite PA, et al. Voriconazole use increases the incidence of skin cancer in lung transplant recipients. Abstract 507. J Heart and Lung Transplant 2009; S242Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Wilkins K, Turner R, Dolev JC, et al. Cutaneous malignancy and human immunodeficiency virus disease. J Am Acad Dermatol 2006 Feb; 54(2): 189–206PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ulrich C, Kanitakis J, Stockfleth E, et al. Skin cancer in organ transplant recipients where do we stand today? Am J Transplant 2008 Nov; 8(11): 2192–8Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bardin C, Tafzi N. Difficulties in toxicologic interpretation: Identification of sulfonylureas in human plasma and unexplained hypoglycemia. Revue Francophone des Laboratoires 2008; 2008: 39–42CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hoizey G. Identification and quantification of 8 sufonylureas with clinical toxicology interest by liquid chromatogrphy-Ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry and library searching. Clinical chemistry 2005; 50(9): 1666–72CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Trenque. Prevalence of facticious hypoglycaemia associated with sulfonylurea drugs in France in the year 2000. Br J Clinical Pharmacol 2002; (54): 548–52Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Valeyrie-Allanore L, Sassolas B, Roujeau JC. Drug-induced skin, nail and hair disorders. Drug Safety 2007; 30(11): 1011–30PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des medicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Vladutin GD. Genetic predisposition to statin myopathy. Curr Opin Rheumatol 2008; 20: 648–55CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Klopstock T. Drug-induced myopathies. Curr Opin Neurol 2008; 21: 590–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Owczarek J, Jasinska M, Orszulak-Michalak D. Drug-induced myopathies: an overview of the possible mechanisms. Pharmacological Reports 2005; 57: 23–34PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Begaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Anderson GD. Gender differences in pharmacological response. Int Rev Neurobiol 2008; 83: 1–10PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Doucet J, Capet C, Jégo A, et al. Les effets indésirables des médicaments chez le sujet âg®: épidémiologie et prévention. Presse Med 1999; 28: 1789–93PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Haddi E, Charpin D, Tafforeau M, et al. Atopy and systemic reactions to drugs. Allergy 1990; 45: 236–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Collège des Enseignants de Gériatrie. Corpus de Gériatrie: 121-9.http://www.corpusgeriatrie.org (Consulted on May 24 2009)
  6. 6.
    Wolf R, Orion E, Marcos B, et al. Life-threatening acute adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Clinics in Dermatology 2005; 23: 171–81PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Hartleb M, Biernat L, Kochel A. Drug-induced liver damage-a three-year study of patients from one gastroenterological department. Med Sci Monit 2002; 8: 292–6Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Chandy GM, Chandy RG. Drug Induced Liver Diseases in the Elderly. Journal of the Indian Academy of Geriatrics 2008; 4: 68–71Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Begaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Zimmerman HJ. Hepatotoxicity the adverse effects of drugs and other chemicals on the liver. 2nd Edition. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, 1999Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    William M, Lee MD. N Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity. N Engl J Med 2003; 349: 475–85Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ostapowicz G, Fontana RJ, Schiødt FV, et al. Results of a prospective study of acute liver failure at 17 tertiary care centers in the United States. Ann Intern Med 2002; 137: 947–54PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Khan BQ, Lieberman P. Anaphylaxis in the elderly. Aging Health 2008; 4: 377–387CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Begaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, et al. Imputabilité des effets inattendus ou toxiques des médicaments. Thérapie 1985; 40: 111–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Demoly P. Identifier et comprendre les allergies médicamenteuses. http://www.erudit.org/ (Consulted on May 24 2009)
  4. 4.
    Hardman, JG, Limbird, LE, Gilman, AG 1996Goodman & Gilman’s: the Pharma-cologic Basis of Therapeutics9thMc Graw HillLondon4124Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sweetman SC. Martindale: the complete drug reference. 34th ed. London Chicago: Pharmaceutical Press, 2005: 412–4Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Buffum M, Buffum JC. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the elderly. Pain management nursing 2000; 1(2): 40–50PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Kyrill D. Pramatarov: drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus. Clinics in Dermatology 1998; 16: 367–77CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Kennedy AC, Lyell A. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa due to high-dose frusemide. Br Med J 1976 Jun 19; 1(6024): 1509–10PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Kardaun SH, et al. Variability in the clinical pattern of cutaneous side effects of drugs with systemic symptoms: does a DRESS syndrome really exist? Br J Dermatol 2007; 156: 609–11Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Long CC, Finlay AY, Marks R. Fixed drug eruption to mefenamic acid: a report of three cases. Br J Dermatol 1992; 126: 409–11PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Rallis E, Rigopoulos D, Anyfantakis V, et al. Dalmatian dog’-like skin eruption (two cases of multifocal fixed drug eruption induced by mefenamic acid). J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2005; 19: 753–5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Contractor KB, Kaur K, Rodrigues GS, et al. Male breast cancer: is the scenario changing? World J Surg Onc 2008; 6: 58Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Healy D, Herxheimer A, Menkes D. Antidepressants and violence: problems at the interface of medicine and law. PLoS Medicine 2006; 3(9): e372PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Aronson JK. Drug therapy. In: Haslett C, Chilvers ER, Boon NA, Colledge NR, Hunter JAA, editors. Davidson’s principles and practice of medicine 19th ed. Edinburgh: Elsevier Science, 2002: 147–63Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lundkvist J, Jonsson B. Pharmacoeconomics of adverse drug reactions. Fundam Clin Pharmacol 2004; 18(3): 275–80PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wiholm BE, Olsson S, Moore N, et al. Spontaneous reporting systems outside the United States. In: Strom BL, editor. Pharmacoepidemiology. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 1994: 139–55Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hale ZT, Meral KU. The knowledge and attitude of Turkish community pharmacists towards pharmacovigilance in the Kadikoy district of Istanbul. 2008; 30(5): 556–62Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Niswender CM, Herrick-Davis K, Dilley GE, et al. RNA editing of the human serotonin 5-HT2C receptor. Alterations in suicide and implications for serotonergic pharmacotherapy. Neuropsychopharmacology 2001; 24: 478–91PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gurevich I, Tamir H, Arango V, et al. Altered editing of serotonin 2c receptor pre-mRNA in the prefrontal cortex of depressed suicide victims. NeuronApril 2002; 25: 349–5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dracheva S, Patel N, Woo DA, et al. Increased serotonin 2C receptor mRNA editing: a possible risk factor for suicide. Mol Psychiatry 2008; 13(11): 1001–10PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Weidong Yanga, Qingde Wanga, Stephen J. Kanesb, et al. Altered RNA editing of serotonin 5-HT2C receptor induced by interferon: implications for depression associated with cytokine therapy. Molecular Brain Research 124 (2004) 70–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Koren G, Florescu A, Costeri AM, et al. Nonsteroidal ntiinflammatory drugs during third trimester and the risk of premature closure of the ductus arteriosus: a meta-analysis. Ann Pharmacother 2006; 40: 824–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Loudon JAZ, Groom KM, Bennett PR. Prostaglandin inhibitors in preterm labor. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol 2003; 17: 731–44PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Vermillon ST, Scardo JA, Lashus AG, et al. The effect of indomethacin tocolysis on fetal ductus arteriosus constriction with advancing gestational age. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1997; 177: 256–61CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    AFSSAPS. Rappel sur la contre-indication des AINS à partir du 6ième mois de la grossesse, quelle que soit la voie d’administration (Lettre aux professionnels de santé).27/02/2009Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Kessler M, Goldsmith D, Schellekens H. Immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. Nephrol Dial Transplant2006; 21 Suppl5: v9–12PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Giezen TJ, Mantel-Teeuwisse AK, Straus SM, et al. Safety-related regulatory actions for biologicals approved in the United States and the European Union. JAMA 2008; 300: 1887–96PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hazell L, Shakir SA. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review. Drug Saf 2006; 29: 385–96PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Meyboom RH, Hekster YA, Egberts AC, et al. Causal or casual? The role of causality assessment in pharmacovigilance. Drug Saf 1997; 17: 374–89PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Laine LA, Bentley E, Chandrasoma P. Effet of oral iron therapy on the upper gastrointestinal tract: a prospective Evaluation. Dig Dis Sci 1988; 33: 172–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kaye P, Abdulla K, Wood J, et al. Iron-induced mucosal pathology of the upper gastrointestinal tract: a common finding in patients on oral iron therapy. Histopathology 2008; 53: 311–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Haig A, Driman DK. Iron-induced mucosal injury to the upper gatro-intestinal tract. Histopathology 2006; 46: 808–12CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Abraham SC, Yardley JH, Wu TT. Erosive injury to the upper gastro-intestinal tract in patients receiving iron medication: an underrrecognized entity. Am J Surg Pathol 1999; 23: 1241–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Report of an independent review of access to the Yellow Card scheme. The Stationary Office. 2004Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ekins-Daukes S. The Yellow Card Scheme: evaluation of patient reporting of suspected adverse drug reactions. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety 2006; 15: 105Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Waller P, Heeley E, Moseley J. Impact analysis of signals detected from spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting data. Drug Safety 2005; 28(10): 843–50PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Report of an independent review of access to the Yellow Card scheme. The Stationary Office. 2004Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Evans SJ, Waller PC, Davis S. Use of proportional reporting ratios (PRRs) for signal generation from spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2001 Oct-Nov; 10(6): 483–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bousquet C, Sadakhom C, Le Beller C, et al. A review of potential signals generated by an automated method on 3324 pharmacovigilance case reports. Therapie 2006 Jan–Feb; 61(1): 39–47PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Thiessard F, Roux E, Miremont-Salamé G, et al. Trends in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports to the French pharmacovigilance system (1986–2001). Drug Saf 2005; 28(8): 731–40PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Evans SJW, Waller PC, Davis S. Use of proportional reporting ratios (PRRs) for signal generation from spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2001; 10: 483–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Evans SJW, Waller PC, Davis S. Use of proportional reporting ratios (PRRs) for signal generation from spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 2001; 10: 483–6PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Calva J, Bojalil R. Antibiotic use in a periurban community in Mexico: a household and drugstore survey. Soc Sci Med 1996; 48(8): 1121–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Geissler PW, Nokes K, Prince RJ, Achieng RO, et al. Children and medicines: self-treatment of common illness among Luo school children in Western Kenya. Soc Sci Med 2000; 50: 1771–83PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Habeeb GE, Gear hart JG. Common patient symptoms: Patterns of self treatment and prevention. J Miss State Med Assoc 1993; 34(6): 179–81PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Scalfer J, Slamet LS, de Visscher G. Appropriateness of self-medication: method development and testing in urban Indonesian. J Clin Pharm Ther 1997; 22(4): 261–72CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Pouyanne P, Haramburu F, Imbs JL, et al. Admissions to hospital caused by adverse drug reactions: cross sectional incidence study. French Pharmacovigilance Centres BMJ 2000 Apr 15; 320 (7241): 1036Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ahmed I, Haramburu F, Fourrier-Réglat A, et al. Bayesian pharmacovigilance signal detection methods revisited in a multiple comparison setting. Stat Med 2009 Jun 15; 28(13): 1774–92PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Barrau K, Thirion X, Micallef J, et al. Comparison of methadone and high dosage buprenorphine users in French care centres. Addiction 2001 Oct;96(10): 1433–41PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Boeuf O, Lapeyre-Mestre M, French Network of Centers for Evaluation and Information Pharmacodependence (CEIP). Survey of forged prescrip-tions to investigate risk of psychoactive medications abuse in France: results of OSIAP survey. Drug Saf 2007; 30(3): 265–1Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pradel V, Frauger E, Thirion X, et al. Impact of a prescription monitoring program on doctor-shopping for high dosage buprenorphine. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug safety 2009 Jan; 18(1): 36–43PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Chaplain G, Milan C, Sgro C, et al. Increased risk of acute leukemia after adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: a population-based study. J Clin Oncol 2000 Aug; 18(15): 2836–42PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Sonck J, Laureys G, Verbeelen D. The neurotoxicity and safety of treatment with cefepime in patients with renal failure. Nephrol Dial Transplant 2008; 23: 966–70PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Abanades S, Noolla J, Rodriguez-Campello A, et al. Reversible coma secondary to cefepime neurotoxicity. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy 2004; 38: 606–8PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Barbhaiya RH, Knupp CA, Forgue ST, et al. Pharmacokinetics of cefepime in subjects with renal insufficiency. Clin Pharmacol Ther 1990; 48(3): 268–76PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Chatellier D, Jourdain M, Mangalaboyi J, et al. Cefepime-induced neurotoxicity: an underestimated complication of antibiotherapy in patients with acute renal failure. Intensive Care Med 2002; 28: 214–7PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Eli Lilly and Company Limited. summary of product characteristics. 22-10-2008Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Eli Lilly and Company Limited. summary of product characteristics. 22-10-2008Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Lyseng-Williamson KA, Keating GM. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron-deficiency anaemia. Drugs 2009; 69(6): 739–56PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Seid MH, Derman RJ, Baker JB, et al. Ferric carboxymaltose injection in the treatment of postpartum iron deficiency anemia: a randomized controlled clinical trial. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2008 Oct; 199(4): 435PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Van Wyck DB, Martens MG, Seid MH, et al. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose compared with oral iron in the treatment of postpartum anemia: a randomized controlled trial. Obstet Gynecol 2007 Aug; 110 (2 Pt 1): 267–78PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Grimmelt AC, Cohen CD, Fehr T, et al. Safety and tolerability of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) for treatment of iron deficiency in patients with chronic kidney disease and in kidney transplant recipients. Clin Nephrol 2009 Feb;71(2): 125–9PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Galenica, communiqué de presse, 11.11.2007Google Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Harris RJ, Sterne JA, Abgrall S, et al., Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration. Prognostic importance of anaemia in HIV type-1-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy: collaborative analysis of prospective cohort studies. Antiviral Therapy 2008; 13: 959–67PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Rask C, Albertioni F, Bentzen S, et al. Clinical and pharmacokinetic risk factors for high-dose methotrexate induced toxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a logistic regression analysis. Acta Oncol 1998; 37(3): 277–84PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Piard C, Bressolle F, May F, et al. A limited sampling strategy to estimate individual pharmacokinetic parameters of methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 2007; 60: 609–20PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Laroche ML, Charmes JP, Merle L. Potentially inappropriate medications in the elderly: a French consensus panel list. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2007; 63: 725–31PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Reference

  1. 1.
    Pinocy J, Eingartner C, Ruck P, et al. Recurrent soft tissue infections after accidental inoculation with BCG vaccine. Unfallchirurg 1998 Aug; 101(8): 658–60PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Gliklich R, Wilson J. Epidemiology of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws: the utility of a national registry. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2009; 67: 71–4PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Saussez S, Javadian R, Hupin C, et al. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw and its associated risk factors: a Belgian case series. Laryngoscope 2009; 119: 323–9PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Baim S, Miller PD. Assessing the clinical utility of serum CTX in postmenopausal osteoporosis and its use in predicting risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. J Bone Miner Res 2009; 24: 561–74PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sarasquete ME, García-Sanz R, Marín L, et al. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw is associated with polymorphisms of the cytochrome P450 CYP2C8 in multiple myeloma: a genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Blood 2008; 112: 2709–12PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Cumming RG. Epidemiology of medication-related falls and fractures in the elderly. Drugs Aging 1998 Jan; 12(1): 43–53PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kannus P, Sievänen H, Palvanen M, et al. Prevention of falls and consequent injuries in elderly people. Lancet 2005 Nov 26; 366(9500): 1885–93PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Leipzig RM, et al. Drugs and falls in older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis I. Psychotropic drugs. J Am Geriatr Soc 1999; 47(1): 30–9PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Leipzig RM, et al. Drugs and falls in older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis II. Cardiac and analgesic drugs. J Am Geriatr Soc 1999; 47(1): 40–50PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    De Vane L. Pharmacokinetics: drug interactions and tolerability of valproate. Psychopharmacology Bulletin 2003; 37(2): 25–42Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Loscher W. Basis pharmacology of valproate: a review after 35 years of use for the treatment of epilepsy. CNS Drugs 2002; 16: 669–94PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Perucca E. Patient-tailored antiepileptic drug therapy: predicting response to antiepileptic drugs. International Congress Series 2002; 1244: 93–103CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Product information, Depakoate®, Abbott Laboratories, Inc., Physians Desk Reference, Thomson PDR, Montvale, NJ, 2003Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Verrotti A, Manco R, Matricardi S, et al. Antiepileptic drugs and visual function. Pediatr Neurol 2007; 36: 353–60PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bekkelund SI, Lilleng H, Tønseth S. Gabapentin may cause reversible visual field constriction. BMJ 2006; 332: 1193PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Adisa R, Fakeye TO, Dike D. Evaluation of Adverse Drug Reactions to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy in a Nigeria University Community. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research 2008 Jun; 7(2): 937–44CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    McIntosh HM, Olliaro P. Artemisinin derivatives for treating uncomplicated malaria. Cochrane Database syst Rev 2000; CD000256Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Taylor WR, White NJ. Antimalarial drug toxicity: a review. Drug saf 2004; 27: 25–61 ai4._Talisuna OA, Sarah G, D’Alessandro U. Pharmacovigilance of antimalarial treatment in Africa: is it possible. Malaria Journal 2006 Jun 16; 5(1): 50PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Zou H, Hastie T. Regularization and variable selection via the elastic net. J R Statistic Soc B 2005; 67: 301–20CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Schneeweiss S, Hasford J, Göttler M, et al. Admissions caused by adverse drug events to internal medicine and emergency departments in hospitals: a longitudinal population-based study. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2002; 58: 285–91PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tibshirani R. Regression shrinkage and selection via the lasso. J Royal Statist Soc B 1996; 58(1): 267–88Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hoerl A, Kennard R. Ridge Regression. Encyclopedia of Statistical Sciences 1988; 8: 129–36Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Goeman J. The penalized Package. Version 0.9-24 2009; URL: http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/penalized/

Reference

  1. 1.
    Schneeweiss S, Hasford J, Göttler M, et al. Admissions caused by adverse drug events to internal medicine and emergency departments in hospitals: a longitudinal population-based study. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 2002; 58: 285–91PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Seeger J, Loughlin J, Rivero E, et al. NO Evidence for Association of Tegaserod with Cardiovascular Adverse Ischemic Events (Cvie) in Routine Clinical Practice. Am J Gastroenterol 2008; 103: S465Google Scholar
  2. 2.
  3. 3.
    Notification to Health Care Providers. Tegaserod (Zelmac) 18 de Junio de 2008. http://www.cofepris.gob.mx/bv/tegaserod.pdf
  4. 4.
    Schmulson Wasserman MJ, Pulido London D. Comorbilidad cardiovascular, tegaserod y otros tratamientos en pacientes con trastornos funcionales gastrointestinales (tfgi), síndrome de intestino irritable (sii) y estreñimiento crónico (ec). Rev Gastroenterol Mex 2007; 72 Suppl. 2: 180Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Hess LM, et al. Factors associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw among bisphosphonate users. Am J Med 2008; 121: 475–83PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Haff AO, et al. Frequency and risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw in cancer patients treated with intravenous bisphosphonates. J Bone Miner Res 2008; 23: 826–36CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Trenque T, et al. Osteonecrosis of the jaw with bisphosphonates: a safety review. Drug Safety 2006; 29: 969Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ruggiero SL, et al. Osteonecrosis of the jaw associated with the use of bisphosphonates: a review of 63 cases. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2004; 62: 527–34PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Adis Data Information BV 2009

Personalised recommendations