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Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 77–82 | Cite as

Teaching evidence-based integrative medicine: description of a model programme

  • David L. Katz
  • Alyse Behrman Sabina
  • Christine Girard
  • Harry Adelson
  • Lauren Schiller-Liberti
  • Anna-leila Williams
Education
  • 5 Downloads

Abstract

Complementary and alternative medicine is of great importance to the American public, yet often resisted by a conventional medical community unschooled in its methods. To provide the public with safe and unprejudiced access to all modes of health care, the integration of conventional and complementary care is needed. The Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital (Derby, Connecticut, USA) has implemented a unique model of integrative care in which allopathic and naturopathic providers base treatment recommendations on consensus. The centre is used as a training site for allopathic students and naturopathic residents; and, in conjunction with Yale’s Prevention Research Center, also provides training in research methods. Since its inception in 2000, three naturopathic residents have graduated and high patient satisfaction has been consistently achieved. The model described has the potential to advance the delivery of integrative care, train naturopathic practitioners in evidence-based methods, and create collaboration between allopathic and alternative providers.

Keywords

alternative medicine integrative medicine medical education naturopathic medicine patient-centred care 

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Copyright information

© Open Mind Journals Limited 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Katz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Alyse Behrman Sabina
    • 1
  • Christine Girard
    • 1
    • 3
  • Harry Adelson
    • 1
    • 3
  • Lauren Schiller-Liberti
    • 1
    • 3
  • Anna-leila Williams
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Yale-Griffin Prevention Research CenterDerbyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Integrative Medicine CenterGriffin HospitalDerbyUSA

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